Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A rod or bar forming a step of a ladder.
  • n. A crosspiece between the legs of a chair.
  • n. The spoke in a wheel.
  • n. Nautical One of the spokes or handles on a ship's wheel.
  • n. A level or degree in a hierarchy: a middle manager awaiting a promotion to the next rung.
  • v. Past participle of ring2.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A crosspiece forming a step of a ladder; a round.
  • n. A crosspiece between legs of a chair.
  • n. A floor timber in a ship.
  • n. One of the stakes of a cart; a spar; a heavy staff.
  • n. One of the radial handles projecting from the rim of a steering wheel.
  • n. One of the pins or trundles of a lantern wheel.
  • v. Past participle of ring

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • imp. & p. p. of ring.
  • n. A floor timber in a ship.
  • n. One of the rounds of a ladder.
  • n. One of the stakes of a cart; a spar; a heavy staff.
  • n. One of the radial handles projecting from the rim of a steering wheel; also, one of the pins or trundles of a lantern wheel.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Ringed; having a ring through the snout, as a hog.
  • n. A rod or bar; a heavy staff; hence, a cudgel; a club.
  • n. Specifically A round or step of a ladder.
  • n. One of the bars of a windmill-sail.
  • n. A spoke or bar of a wallower or lantern-wheel; a rundle.
  • n. Nautical: One of the projecting handles of a steering-wheel.
  • n. A floor-timber in a ship.
  • n. Preterit and past participle of ring.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. one of the crosspieces that form the steps of a ladder
  • n. a crosspiece between the legs of a chair

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English hrung.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English hrung. (Wiktionary)
From the verb ring. This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • To my own "frangine" who has just rung from the airport to say she is back home again after trekking for three weeks in the mountains of Bhutan and is on her way over to tell me of latest adventures, laughingly hinting that this was the hardest trek yet!

    la frangine - French Word-A-Day

  • Not a huge nerd, but the name rung a bell so I googled it.

    Tim Robbins Cast in Green Lantern | /Film

  • On the lowest rung is the corrupt souls who find violence acceptable (ALL MALES::: black, latino, Hells Angels, etc).

    Letter Two

  • The bottom rung is for players aspiring to make the Pro Bowl.

    OT rankings: Modern linemen trail Munoz's lead closely

  • I bought a great rug and made them a reading corner with pillows and the sheepskin rung that Lola slept on when she was a baby (she especially loves this corner, and is at this very moment sleeping there).

    February 2006

  • The first rung is at 100 million net wealth or somewhere thereof.

    Think Progress » Tony Snow On The Issues

  • She was a seaman apprentice, one rung from the lowest pay grade in the US Navy.

    The Straits of Oh MAN! Navy memories

  • I passed on to the dauphin's apartment, where, an instant later, I heard the tocsin rung and the générale beaten in all quarters on Paris.

    The Ruin of a Princess

  • May 31st we heard the générale beaten and the tocsin rung, but no one would tell us the cause of the uproar.

    The Ruin of a Princess

  • I heard the générale beaten and the tocsin rung; I was very uneasy.

    The Ruin of a Princess

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Comments

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  • That's how *my* list wants to see it, anyway--as part of a ladder.

    March 12, 2007

  • An irritating word when used in place of rang. I just don't like it. Though it improves drastically when used to describe the bars on a ladder.

    March 11, 2007