Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Characterized by greatness of scope or intent; grand. See Synonyms at grand.
  • adj. Characterized by feigned or affected grandeur; pompous.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. large and impressive, in size, scope or extent
  • adj. pompous or pretentious

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Impressive or elevating in effect; imposing; splendid; striking; -- in a good sense.
  • adj. Characterized by affectation of grandeur or splendor; flaunting; turgid; bombastic; -- in a bad sense.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Impressive from inherent grandeur; grand in effect; magnificent; imposing.
  • Characterized by self-display or bombast; vulgarly showy or flaunting; grandiloquent; swollen; turgid: as, a grandiose style.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. affectedly genteel
  • adj. impressive because of unnecessary largeness or grandeur; used to show disapproval

Etymologies

French, from Italian grandioso, from grande, great, from Latin grandis.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French grandiose, from Italian grandioso, from Latin grandis ("great, grand") (English grand). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • But Wednesday's speech - which Gingrich himself called "grandiose" - could actually resonate politically in Florida, where space exploration is good politics 14 miles away from Cape Canaveral.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • Desert landscapes with unspeakable monsters hiding in grandiose mysterious structures, a dread and a trembling for an amateur adventurer and a professional curiosity for Sean Connery-like types.

    H. P. Lovecraft "At the Mountains of Madness" and other masterpieces of terror

  • The main grandiose building covered with ceramic scenes glorifying Soviet achievements is closed.

    Russia's Troubled Waters Flow With The Mighty Volga

  • The NBA opened its doors Sunday in grandiose Cowboys Stadium, and, in typical Texas style, put its greatest stars on the biggest stage ever to witness a basketball game.

    Record 100,000-plus crowd takes in All-Star Game in Dallas

  • ARLINGTON, Texas The NBA opened its doors Sunday in grandiose Cowboys Stadium, and, in typical Texas style, put its greatest stars on the biggest stage ever to witness a basketball game. —

    Record 100,000-plus crowd takes in All-Star Game in Dallas

  • In the presidential primaries, he showed little interest in grandiose promises.

    Mr. Conservative

  • Kane, who tended to describe his creations (and those of his colleagues when he claimed them for himself) in grandiose terms, stated in his memoir Batman and Me: Robin evolved from my fantasies as a kid of fourteen, when I visualized myself as a young boy fighting alongside my idol, Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.

    Reason for Robin, #3

  • Hoffman considered the moniker grandiose and misleading.

    Hi-Ya!

  • He was referring to his grandiose future plans, and his tone was one of absolute, calm certainty.

    To Ruin a Queen

  • So, in grandiose terms I suppose, these are the issues that I’m pondering as 2008 approaches and as I ready myself for the challenges and battles that lie ahead.

    Data portability and thinking ahead to 2008 | FactoryCity

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Comments

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  • grandiose & grandiosity: characterized by greatness of scope or intent. Impressive or elevating in effect; imposing; splendid; striking; -- in a good sense. at times i suffer from grandiosity. inflated sense of self. it does not mean what i am feeling and the expressions of myrself are not real or true or on the negative side of grandiose.

    May 5, 2012

  • to be grandiose is to display an exaggerated manner

    August 13, 2007