Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To withdraw, as for rest or seclusion.
  • intransitive v. To go to bed.
  • intransitive v. To withdraw from one's occupation, business, or office; stop working.
  • intransitive v. To fall back or retreat, as from battle.
  • intransitive v. To move back or away; recede.
  • transitive v. To cause to withdraw from one's usual field of activity: retired all executives at 55.
  • transitive v. To lead (troops, for example) away from action; withdraw.
  • transitive v. To take out of circulation: retired the bonds.
  • transitive v. To withdraw from use or active service: retiring an old battleship.
  • transitive v. Baseball To put out (a batter).
  • transitive v. Baseball To cause (the opposing team) to end a turn at bat.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires.
  • n. A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back.
  • v. To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively.
  • v. To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay; as, to retire bonds; to retire a note.
  • v. To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list; as, to retire a military or naval officer.
  • v. to voluntarily stop batting before being dismissed so that the next batsman can bat
  • v. , to make a defensive play which results in a runner or the batter being put out
  • v. To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice.
  • v. To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure; as, to retire from battle.
  • v. To withdraw from a public station, from working, or from business
  • v. To recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs.
  • v. To go to bed; as, he usually retires early.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires.
  • n. A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back.
  • intransitive v. To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy
  • intransitive v. To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure.
  • intransitive v. To withdraw from a public station, or from business.
  • intransitive v. To recede; to fall or bend back.
  • intransitive v. To go to bed.
  • transitive v. To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively.
  • transitive v. To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay
  • transitive v. To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To draw back; take or lead back; cause to move backward or retreat.
  • To take away; withdraw: remove.
  • To lead apart from others; bring into retirement; remove as from a company or a frequented place into seclusion: generally with a reflexive pronoun.
  • To withdraw; separate; abstract.
  • Specifically, to remove from active service; place on the retired list, as of the army or navy.
  • To recover; redeem; regain by the payment of a sum of money; hence, specifically, to withdraw from circulation by taking up and paying: as, to retire the bonds of a railway company; to retire a bill.
  • To draw back; go back; return.
  • To draw back; fall back; retreat, as from battle or danger.
  • To withdraw; go away or apart; depart; especially, to betake one's self, as from a company or a frequented place, into privacy; go into retirement or seclusion; in the army or navy, to go voluntarily on the retired list.
  • To withdraw from business or active life.
  • Specifically, to go to bed.
  • To slope back; recede; retreat.
  • Synonyms and To depart, recede. See retreat.
  • In the law of negotiable instruments: To take up (a bill or note) from a prior transferee and thereafter hold (it) with all remedies intact: said of an indorser.
  • To retire (a bill or note) by taking (it) up at maturity, with all remedies on it extinguished: said of an acceptor.
  • n. The act of retiring; withdrawal.
  • n. Retreat, especially in war.
  • n. Retirement; withdrawal into privacy or seclusion; hence, a state of retirement.
  • n. A place of retirement or withdrawal.
  • n. Repair; resort.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position
  • v. make (someone) retire
  • v. pull back or move away or backward
  • v. cause to be out on a fielding play
  • v. withdraw from circulation or from the market, as of bills, shares, and bonds
  • v. break from a meeting or gathering
  • v. prepare for sleep
  • v. cause to get out
  • v. withdraw from active participation
  • v. lose interest
  • v. dispose of (something no longer useful or needed)

Etymologies

French retirer, to retreat, from Old French, to take back : re-, re- + tirer, to draw; see tier1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle French retirer ("draw back"), from prefix re- ("back"), + verb tirer ("draw, pull"), from Old French tirer, tirier ("to draw out, arrange, adorn"), from tire, tiere ("row, rank, order, dress") of Germanic origin akin to Old English and Old Saxon tīr ("fame, glory, ornament"), Old English tīer ("rank, row"), Old High German ziari, zēri ("ornament"), German Zier ("ornament, adornment"), German zieren ("to adorn"). More at tier (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • Cricket jargon - a batsman retires when he interrupts his innings voluntarily. If he does so due to injury or illness he may resume his innings later. If he does so for any other reason he may not resume without the permission of the opposing captain.

    December 2, 2007

  • Contronymic in the sense: retreat vs. renew, as in put new tires on your car.

    January 26, 2007