Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To lose brightness, loudness, or brilliance gradually; dim: The lights and music faded as we set sail from the harbor.
  • intransitive v. To lose freshness; wither: summer flowers that had faded.
  • intransitive v. To lose strength or vitality; wane: youthful energy that had faded over the years.
  • intransitive v. To disappear gradually; vanish: a hope that faded. See Synonyms at disappear.
  • intransitive v. Sports To swerve from a straight course, especially in the direction of a slice.
  • intransitive v. Football To move back from the line of scrimmage. Used of a quarterback.
  • transitive v. To cause to lose brightness, freshness, or strength: Exposure to sunlight has faded the carpet.
  • transitive v. Sports To hit (a golf ball, for instance) with a moderate, usually controlled slice.
  • transitive v. Games To meet the bet of (an opposing player) in dice.
  • n. A gradual diminution or increase in the brightness or visibility of an image in cinema or television.
  • n. A periodic reduction in the received strength of a radio transmission.
  • n. Sports A moderate, usually controlled slice, as in golf.
  • fade in To appear gradually.
  • fade in To cause to appear or be heard gradually. Used of a cinematic or television image or of a sound.
  • fade out To disappear gradually.
  • fade out To cause to disappear gradually. Used of a cinematic or television image or of a sound.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Weak; insipid; tasteless; commonplace.
  • n. A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves intentionally to the right. See slice, hook, draw.
  • n. A haircut where the hair is short or shaved on the sides of the head and longer on top. See also high-top fade and low fade.
  • v. To become fade; to grow weak; to lose strength; to decay; to perish gradually; to wither, as a plant.
  • v. To lose freshness, color, or brightness; to become faint in hue or tint; hence, to be wanting in color.
  • v. To sink away; to disappear gradually; to grow dim; to vanish.
  • v. To cause to fade.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Weak; insipid; tasteless; commonplace.
  • intransitive v. To become fade; to grow weak; to lose strength; to decay; to perish gradually; to wither, as a plant.
  • intransitive v. To lose freshness, color, or brightness; to become faint in hue or tint; hence, to be wanting in color.
  • intransitive v. To sink away; to disappear gradually; to grow dim; to vanish.
  • transitive v. To cause to wither; to deprive of freshness or vigor; to wear away.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pale; wan; faded.
  • Withered; faded, as a plant.
  • Insipid; tasteless; uninteresting.
  • To become pale or wan; lose freshness, color, brightness, or distinctness; tend from a stronger or brighter color to a more faint shade of the same color, or from visibleness to invisibility; become weak in hue or tint or in outline; have the distinctive or characteristic features disappear gradually; grow dim or indistinct to the sight.
  • To wither, as a plant; in general, to gradually lose strength, health, or vigor; decay; perish or disappear gradually.
  • Synonyms To droop, languish.
  • To cause to lose brightness or freshness of color; cause to lose distinctness to the sight.
  • To cause to wither; wear away; deprive of freshness or vigor.
  • Strong; bold; doughty.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a golf shot that curves to the right for a right-handed golfer
  • v. lose freshness, vigor, or vitality
  • v. disappear gradually
  • v. become less clearly visible or distinguishable; disappear gradually or seemingly
  • n. gradually ceasing to be visible
  • v. become feeble

Etymologies

Middle English faden, from Old French fader, from fade, faded, probably from Vulgar Latin *fatidus, alteration of Latin fatuus, insipid.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French fader, from fade. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • A "fade" or "faded" men's hairstyle is one that starts short and becomes progressively longer. In a hi-top fade the hair on the sides is cut off or kept very short and the hair on the top of the head is very long, similar to a flattop. In a low fade style, hair on the top is kept shorter.

    April 13, 2011