Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Not moving or able to move quickly; proceeding at a low speed: a slow train; slow walkers.
  • adj. Marked by a retarded tempo: a slow waltz.
  • adj. Taking or requiring a long time: the slow job of making bread.
  • adj. Taking more time than is usual: a slow worker; slow progress in the peace negotiations.
  • adj. Allowing movement or action only at a low speed: a slow track; a slow infield.
  • adj. Registering a time or rate behind or below the correct one: a slow clock.
  • adj. Lacking in promptness or willingness; not precipitate: They were slow to accept our invitation.
  • adj. Characterized by a low volume of sales or transactions: Business was slow today.
  • adj. Lacking liveliness or interest; boring: a slow party.
  • adj. Not having or exhibiting intellectual or mental quickness: a slow learner.
  • adj. Only moderately warm; low: a slow oven.
  • adv. So as to fall behind the correct time or rate: The watch runs slow.
  • adv. At a low speed: Go slow!
  • transitive v. To make slow or slower.
  • transitive v. To delay; retard.
  • intransitive v. To become slow or slower.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Taking a long time to move or go a short distance, or to perform an action; not quick in motion; proceeding at a low speed.
  • adj. Not happening in a short time; spread over a comparatively long time.
  • adj. Of reduced intellectual capacity; not quick to comprehend.
  • adj. Not hasty; not precipitate; lacking in promptness; acting with deliberation.
  • adj. Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time.
  • adj. That takes a long time to transfer data.
  • adj. Lacking spirit; deficient in liveliness or briskness.
  • adj. Not busy; lacking activity.
  • v. To make (something) run, move, etc. less quickly; to reduce the speed of.
  • v. To keep from going quickly; to hinder the progress of.
  • v. To become slow; to slacken in speed; to decelerate.
  • n. Someone who is slow; a sluggard.
  • n. A slow song.
  • adv. Slowly.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Moving a short space in a relatively long time; not swift; not quick in motion; not rapid; moderate; deliberate.
  • adj. Not happening in a short time; gradual; late.
  • adj. Not ready; not prompt or quick; dilatory; sluggish.
  • adj. Not hasty; not precipitate; acting with deliberation; tardy; inactive.
  • adj. Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time.
  • adj. Not advancing or improving rapidly.
  • adj. Heavy in wit; not alert, prompt, or spirited; wearisome; dull.
  • adv. Slowly.
  • n. A moth.
  • Slew.
  • intransitive v. To go slower; -- often with up.
  • transitive v. To render slow; to slacken the speed of; to retard; to delay.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Taking a long time to move or go a short distance; not quick in motion; not rapid: as, a slow train; a slow messenger.
  • Not happening in a short time; spread over a comparatively long time; gradual: as, a slow change; the slow growth of arts.
  • Not ready; not prompt or quick; used absolutely, not quick to comprehend; dull-witted.
  • Tardy; dilatory; sluggish; slothful.
  • Not hasty; not precipitate; acting with deliberation.
  • Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time: as, the clock or watch is slow.
  • Dull; lacking spirit; deficient in liveliness or briskness: used of persons or things: as, the entertainment was very slow.
  • Synonyms Delaying, lingering, deliberate.
  • 3 and
  • Heavy, inert, lumpish.
  • 1–4. Slow, Tardy, Dilatory. Slow and tardy represent either a fact in external events or an element of character; dilatory only the latter. Dilatory expresses that disposition or habit by which one is once or generally slow to go about what ought to be done. See idle.
  • n. A sluggard.
  • Slowly.
  • To become slow; slacken in speed.
  • To make slow; delay; retard.
  • To slacken in speed: as, to slow a locomotive or a steamer: usually with up or down.
  • n. A Middle English spelling of slough.
  • n. In zoöl, a sluggish or slow-paced skink, as the slow-worm or blindworm, Anguis fragilis; also, a newt or eft of like character.
  • n. A Middle English preterit of slay.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. (of business) not active or brisk
  • adj. not moving quickly; taking a comparatively long time
  • adv. without speed (`slow' is sometimes used informally for `slowly')
  • adj. so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness
  • adj. (used of timepieces) indicating a time earlier than the correct time
  • adj. slow to learn or understand; lacking intellectual acuity
  • v. cause to proceed more slowly
  • v. lose velocity; move more slowly
  • adv. of timepieces
  • adj. at a slow tempo
  • v. become slow or slower

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English slāw.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old English slāw. Cognate with Swedish slö. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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