Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of balk.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. stopping short and refusing to go on

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When the gentleman who guided me through the bush left me on the side of a pali, I discovered that Kahele, though strong, gentle, and sure-footed, possesses the odious fault known as balking, and expressed his aversion to ascend the other side in a most unmistakable manner.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

  • Now, some of his foreign policies are still idiocy -- such as balking at distributing condoms, or the global gag rule on abortion -- but at least Bush did some things that were helpful, and he spent a lot of money on it.

    My 2008 "McLaughlin Awards" [Part 2]

  • ROBERTS: And, of course, as we heard earlier in the program, China really kind of balking on those really tough sanctions that it might take to get North Korea to give up its nuclear program.

    CNN Transcript Oct 14, 2006

  • Jibbing, or "balking" as the Americans term it, is a detestable vice.

    The Horsewoman A Practical Guide to Side-Saddle Riding, 2nd. Ed.

  • Recent headlines and letters have unfairly accused Assemblywoman Lupardo of "balking" at a reduction in pay.

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  • Other countries such as China and Iran are also "balking" on the idea, using the excuses of U.S.

    Global Issues News Headlines

  • Meanwhile, the Washington Post Friday editorially advised a "balking" Berman, "a long time sceptic of the deal" to find a way to help move the deal forward as "it is in America's interest."

    Zee News : India National

  • "The problem is that Daniel Levy, the Spurs chairman, is a hardball negotiator, and Alex McLeish is" balking "at spending big.

    Telegraph.co.uk: news, business, sport, the Daily Telegraph newspaper, Sunday Telegraph

  • Not only are Republican legislators balking at actually solving the problem with tax extensions -- pretending instead that the economy, which they insisted was in the tank, will easily bail out the situation with new revenues -- Democrats in the Assembly are pursuing their opposite fantasy: More money means that already enacted cuts can be reversed.

    William Bradley: Jerry Brown's New Problem

  • However, the proposed treatment of that potential claim has the FDIC balking at the plan.

    FDIC Challenges Corus

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