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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To fill (something) with air or gas so as to make it swell.
  • transitive v. To enlarge or amplify unduly or improperly; aggrandize.
  • transitive v. To raise or expand abnormally or improperly. See Synonyms at exaggerate.
  • transitive v. To cause (a currency or an economy) to undergo inflation.
  • intransitive v. To become inflated.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To enlarge an object by pushing air (or a gas) into it; to raise or expand abnormally
  • v. To enlarge by filling with air (or a gas).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Blown in; inflated.
  • intransitive v. To expand; to fill; to distend.
  • transitive v. To swell or distend with air or gas; to dilate; to expand; to enlarge
  • transitive v. Fig.: To swell; to puff up; to elate.
  • transitive v. To cause to become unduly expanded or increased.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To swell or distend by inhaling or injecting air or gas; distend in any manner: as, to infiate the lungs, a bladder, or a balloon.
  • To swell or extend unduly; expand beyond proper or natural limits; raise above the just amount or value: as, to infiate the currency or prices; to inflate the market (that is, the price of marketable commodities, as stocks).
  • To puff out or up; make swollen or turgid.
  • To puff up; elate: as, to inflate one with pride or self-importance.
  • Inflated.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. increase the amount or availability of, creating a rise in value
  • v. become inflated
  • v. fill with gas or air
  • v. cause prices to rise by increasing the available currency or credit
  • v. exaggerate or make bigger

Etymologies

Middle English inflaten, from Latin īnflāre, īnflāt- : in-, in; see in-2 + flāre, to blow; see bhlē- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin īnflātus, from the verb īnflō. (Wiktionary)

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