Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A raised roadway, as across water or marshland.
  • noun A paved highway.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To provide with a cause way; pave, as a road or street, with blocks of stone.
  • noun A road or path raised above the natural level of the ground by stones, earth, timber, fascines, or the like, serving as a dry passage over wet or marshy ground, over shallow water, or along the top of an embankment.
  • noun A sidewalk, or path at the side of a street or road raised above the carriageway.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A way or road raised above the natural level of the ground, serving as a dry passage over wet or marshy ground.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A road that is raised, as to be above water, marshland etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb pave a road with cobblestones or pebbles
  • noun a road that is raised above water or marshland or sand
  • verb provide with a causeway

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English caucewei : cauce, raised road (from Norman French caucie, from Medieval Latin calciāta (via), paved (road), from Latin calx, calc-, limestone; see calx) + wei, road (variant of way; see way).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English cauceweye, with the first element from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French caucee or caucie, cauchie, from Vulgar Latin *calciāta (compare modern French chaussée from Old French chaucie, itself from the same source), either from Latin calx, calcis ("limestone"), or alternatively from Latin calciāre ("to stamp with the heels, tread"), from calx ("heel"). The second element corresponds to English way.

Examples

  • The causeway is the main one, and a toll bridge ($2) on the West end of the Island, plus the Bolivar Ferry. eipi10 said ...

    Galveston on Stilts

  • The reason that the Lake Pontchartrain causeway was built is because cars and trucks can’t negotiate 14-24 feet of water.

    You go, Shepard « BuzzMachine

  • In other words, the causeway might be the cause of its own destruction.

    Carol Polsgrove: Indiana Farmers Fear a Cost-Cutting Plan to Carry I-69 Across a Floodplain on a Causeway

  • This name signifies in Arabic causeway, paved or flagged road, and a milliary mentioned by Sterrett (Corpus inscript. latin.,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 13: Revelation-Stock

  • The ride through the winding lane between the Yacht Club and the causeway was a blur of swerves, as I fought my way around two or three slow-moving limos filled with drunken teenagers.

    Walls of Silence

  • The ride through the winding lane between the Yacht Club and the causeway was a blur of swerves, as I fought my way around two or three slow-moving limos filled with drunken teenagers.

    Walls of Silence

  • The ride through the winding lane between the Yacht Club and the causeway was a blur of swerves, as I fought my way around two or three slow-moving limos filled with drunken teenagers.

    Walls of Silence

  • The buff stone barbican at the end of the causeway was a small fortress in itself.

    Nemesis

  • The drop under the causeway was a thousand feet, straight into the river gorge below.

    River God

  • At the far end of the causeway was a plot of level ground, strewn with potsherds and heaps of refuse.

    Life and sport in China Second Edition

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