Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A paved walkway along the side of a street.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a paved footpath at the side of a road for the use of pedestrians; a pavement (UK) or footpath (Australia)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A walk for foot passengers at the side of a street or road; a foot pavement.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A footwalk by the side of a street or road; specifically, a paved or otherwise prepared way for pedestrians in a town, usually separated from the roadway by a curb and gutter. Also (in Great Britain nearly always) called pavement.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. walk consisting of a paved area for pedestrians; usually beside a street or roadway

Etymologies

From side +‎ walk. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • the owners of this property are pleased to allow the public a revocable license to use this private sidewalk area.

    October 29, 2008

  • Personally, I find "nature strip" hilarious when I think of the suburbs I grew up in, as if one might expect to see, as one strolls down the sidewalk, interesting fauna and flora all labeled with their proper Linnaean names and places of origin, instead of an undistinguished narrow tract of suburban grass and dandelions with the occasional manhole cover and fire hydrant. Nature, indeed.

    May 9, 2008

  • Our family always called it "the right of way" because of the public utilities, similar to dontcry.

    May 9, 2008

  • I've never heard it have a name either. In my mind, a nature strip is the same as a median strip: the island in the middle of a wide road.

    May 9, 2008

  • I've seen road signs saying 'Keep off the verge'. No-one takes any notice in the UK. I'm always seeing cars on the verge of being driven off the verge they were requested to keep off of.

    May 9, 2008

  • UK here (I don't think “verge” is any more local than that, though I may be wrong).

    May 9, 2008

  • What I love about New Jerseyans: One describes one's neighborhood by the nearest turnpike exit. :-)

    May 9, 2008

  • I grew up in Baltimore (the 'burbs, actually - Parkville and Lutherville, to be precise), and I don't remember this grassy strip ever being called anything, except "the grass between the sidewalk and the road" (as in, "Don't forget to mow . . ."). But according to your map, ptero, I should have been calling it berm! I didn't even know this word existed, but it's a good one. Thanks!

    May 9, 2008

  • Yup. Exit 4.

    May 9, 2008

  • Ooooh, Southern New Jersey. Now I understand. ;-)

    May 9, 2008

  • Southern New Jersey near Philadelphia.

    May 9, 2008

  • I'm with bilby: the nature strip lies between the footpath and the road.

    May 8, 2008

  • Funny, mollusque--I think we're in the same general region and I've never heard "curb strip" used. *thinking*

    May 8, 2008

  • Hey sarra and mollusque -- where are you from?

    May 8, 2008

  • It's a verge here (while the sidewalk is, naturally, the pavement).

    May 8, 2008

  • Doppelganger blues, dc :-(

    May 8, 2008

  • See also: footpath.

    May 8, 2008

  • Bilby: are you beside yourself today?

    May 8, 2008

  • The map has my location pegged: curb strip it is.

    May 8, 2008

  • In Australia I've never heard it called anything other than nature strip.

    May 8, 2008

  • In Australia I've never heard it called anything other than nature strip.

    May 8, 2008

  • I think we call it, Marylanders that is (no, no relation to Ann Landers), the utility area or strip or something like that. It's usually the place the cable, phone, & gas, guys rip to shreds once a year or so.

    May 8, 2008

  • Parking strip.

    May 8, 2008

  • It should be called Dog Doo Alley -- in every state!

    May 8, 2008

  • Also, I think Wisconsinite is a really funny word. :-)

    May 8, 2008

  • Here's a chance for me to post another one of those regional dialect maps. What do you call the area of grass between the sidewalk and the road?

    I, personally, have no word for it, but apparently Iowans call it the parking, Ohioans call it the tree lawn, and Wisconsinites call it the terrace. See maps here.

    May 8, 2008