Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The entire body of salt water that covers more than 70 percent of the earth's surface.
  • noun Any of the principal divisions of the ocean, including the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Southern Oceans.
  • noun A great expanse or amount.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The body of water which envelops the earth, and covers almost three fourths of its surface with a mean depth — as nearly as can be estimated at the present time — of less than 12,500 feet.
  • noun Something likened to the ocean; also, a great quantity: as, an ocean of trouble.
  • Of or pertaining to the main or great sea.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The whole body of salt water which covers more than three fifths of the surface of the globe; -- called also the sea, or great sea.
  • noun One of the large bodies of water into which the great ocean is regarded as divided, as the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic and Antarctic oceans.
  • noun An immense expanse; any vast space or quantity without apparent limits
  • adjective Of or pertaining to the main or great sea

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun countable One of the five large bodies of water separating the continents.
  • noun uncountable Water belonging to an ocean.
  • noun figuratively An immense expanse; any vast space or quantity without apparent limits.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun anything apparently limitless in quantity or volume
  • noun a large body of water constituting a principal part of the hydrosphere

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English occean, from Old French, from Latin ōceanus, from Greek Ōkeanos, the god Oceanus, a great river encircling the earth.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French occean (later reborrowed from Middle French ocean), from Latin Oceanus, from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανός (Ōkeanós, "Oceanus", a water deity).

Examples

Comments

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  • The H.M.S. Ocean was listed as a "transport" captured at Yorktown in 1781. I wonder if, when it was sailing the Atlantic, it was camouflaged.

    October 29, 2007