Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A suspension of small globules of one liquid in a second liquid with which the first will not mix: an emulsion of oil in vinegar.
  • n. A photosensitive coating, usually of silver halide grains in a thin gelatin layer, on photographic film, paper, or glass.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a stable suspension of small droplets of one liquid in another with which it is immiscible
  • n. a colloid in which both phases are liquid
  • n. the coating of photosensitive silver halide grains in a thin gelatine layer on a photographic film

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any liquid preparation of a color and consistency resembling milk; as: (a) In pharmacy, an extract of seeds, or a mixture of oil and water united by a mucilaginous substance. (b) In photography, a liquid preparation of collodion holding salt of silver, used in the photographic process.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A draining out.
  • n. A mixture of liquids insoluble in one another, where one is suspended in the other in the form of minute globules, as the fat (butter) in milk: as, an emulsion of cod-liver oil.
  • n. A mixture in which solid particles are suspended in a liquid in which they are insoluble: as, a camphor emulsion.
  • n. In photography, a name given to various emulsified mixtures used in making dry plates, etc. See photography.
  • n. Unwashed, a collodion containing finely divided silver bromide held in suspension.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a light-sensitive coating on paper or film; consists of fine grains of silver bromide suspended in a gelatin
  • n. (chemistry) a colloid in which both phases are liquids

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

New Latin ēmulsiō, ēmulsiōn-, from Latin ēmulsus, past participle of ēmulgēre, to milk out : ē-, ex-, ex- + mulgēre, to milk; see melg- in Indo-European roots.

Examples

  • Such a dispersion of one liquid in another is called an emulsion.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Such a mixture of two incompatible liquids, with droplets of one liquid dispersed in a continuous phase of the other, is called an emulsion.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • If such an emulsion is rotated quickly, the heavier particles will move farther to the perifery than the lighter ones.

    The Nobel Stamps of 1983

  • We know that when a slurry, an emulsion, is put into a rapidly rotating motion, its heavier constituents are thrown outwards in the direction of the periphery of the motion.

    Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1926 - Presentation Speech

  • From this two-fold point of view such a stable emulsion is comparable to a solution.

    Jean Baptiste Perrin - Nobel Lecture

  • In one method (the horizontal microscope) the rarefaction of the emulsion is obtained immediately from the height, and the resemblance to a miniature atmosphere is extremely striking, precise measurements being possible from instantaneous photographs.

    Jean Baptiste Perrin - Nobel Lecture

  • On the other hand, the steady state in a vertical column of emulsion is produced and maintained by the interplay of two opposing actions, gravity and the Brownian movement; this can be expressed by writing that at each level the flow through diffusion towards the poor regions is equal to that which gravity produces towards the rich regions.

    Jean Baptiste Perrin - Nobel Lecture

  • This emulsion is stable if the particles in suspension do not stick together when the hazards of the Brownian movement bring them into contact, and if they re-enter the liquid when these hazards bring them against the walls or to the surface.

    Jean Baptiste Perrin - Nobel Lecture

  • The equilibrium distribution of an emulsion is due to the Brownian movement, and the more rapidly as this movement is more active.

    Jean Baptiste Perrin - Nobel Lecture

  • Some twenty years ago, the more adventurous manufacturers endeavoured to produce a protective coating of a so-called casein emulsion type.

    Post-War Utilization of Farm-Products

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