Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A military unit consisting of a variable number of combat battalions or regiments.
  • n. A U.S. Army administrative and tactical unit composed of a headquarters unit, at least one unit of infantry or armor or both, and designated support units. A brigade can be commanded by a brigadier general or by a colonel.
  • n. A group of persons organized for a specific purpose: formed a bucket brigade to carry water to the fire.
  • transitive v. To form into a brigade.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A group of people organized to perform a common purpose. e.g. a work brigade, a fire brigade
  • n. Military unit composed of several regiments (or battalions) and including soldiers from different arms of service.
  • v. To form troops into a brigade

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A body of troops, whether cavalry, artillery, infantry, or mixed, consisting of two or more regiments, under the command of a brigadier general.
  • n. Any body of persons organized for acting or marching together under authority.
  • transitive v. To form into a brigade, or into brigades.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A party or division of troops or soldiers, whether cavalry or infantry, regulars or militia, consisting of several regiments, squadrons, or battalions, under the command of a brigadier, or brigadier-general.
  • n. A body of individuals organized, generally wearing a uniform, and acting under authority: as, a fire brigade.
  • To form into a brigade or into brigades: as, regiments of militia are brigaded with regiments of the line.
  • Hence To arrange or embody in a single collection or group; group together, as in zoölogy, under a single name.
  • n. In zoology, a division of no fixed value, used in the sense of ‘cohort,’ as a convenient term for assemblages of animals which may not be included in any of the divisions commonly employed.
  • n. A small squad of engineers or of other technical troops: as, the full sap was executed by a brigade of eight sappers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. form or unite into a brigade
  • n. army unit smaller than a division

Etymologies

French, from Old French, company, from Old Italian brigata, from brigare, to fight, from briga, strife, of Celtic origin; see gwerə-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Borrowing from French brigade (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Song quotation on raggedy.

    November 26, 2008

  • "A military unit consisting of a variable number of combat battalions or regiments.
    A U.S. Army unit composed of a headquarters unit, at least one unit of infantry or armor or both, and designated support units."

    March 17, 2008

  • Although this word could be used to talk about so many different types of organizations; I like it because it makes me think of some kind of punk rock, dyed shag, lip glossy, girl punk band.

    August 15, 2007