Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The angle of inclination from the vertical of a vein, fault, or lode.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In mining, to underlay or incline from a vertical position.
  • noun A slope; the descent of a hill.
  • noun In mining, the inclination of a vein from a vertical position; the complement of the dip: synonymous with underlay. Also hading.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb (Mining) To deviate from the vertical; -- said of a vein, fault, or lode.
  • noun obsolete The descent of a hill.
  • noun (Mining) The inclination or deviation from the vertical of any mineral vein.
  • noun (Geol. & Mining) The deviation of a fault plane from the vertical.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive, obsolete To ordain; consecrate; admit to a religious order.
  • verb geology To slope from the vertical
  • noun geology The slope of a vein or fault from the vertical; the complement of the dip
  • noun obsolete Person (in all senses).
  • noun obsolete Sex; gender.
  • noun Scotland Order; estate; rank; degree; holy or religious orders.
  • noun Scotland State; condition; quality; kind.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Origin unknown.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English hadien, hodien, from Old English hādian ("to ordain, consecrate"), from Old English hād ("rank, order, office, holy office"). See above.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Origin uncertain. Perhaps from a dialectal form of head.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English had, hed, hod, from Old English hād ("person, individual, character, individuality, degree, rank, order, office, holy office, condition, state, nature, character, form, manner, sex, race, family, tribe, choir"), from Proto-Germanic *haiduz (“appearance, kind”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kāi- (“light, bright, shining”). Cognate with Old Saxon hēd ("consition, rank"), Old High German heit ("person, personality, sex, condition, quality, rank"), Old Norse heiðr ("honour, dignity"; > Danish hæder ("honour"), Swedish heder ("honour")), Gothic  (haidus, "way, manner"). Same as -hood.

Examples

    Sorry, no example sentences found.

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