Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A group or band of people.
  • n. A companion or associate.
  • n. A generational group as defined in demographics, statistics, or market research: "The cohort of people aged 30 to 39 . . . were more conservative” ( American Demographics).
  • n. One of the 10 divisions of a Roman legion, consisting of 300 to 600 men.
  • n. A group of soldiers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A group of people supporting the same thing or person.
  • n. A demographic grouping of people, especially those in a defined age group, or having a common characteristic.
  • n. Any division of a Roman legion, normally of about 500 men.
  • n. An accomplice; abettor; associate.
  • n. Any band or body of warriors.
  • n. A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.
  • n. A colleague.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A body of about five or six hundred soldiers; the tenth part of a legion.
  • n. Any band or body of warriors.
  • n. A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Roman antiquity, an infantry division of the legion, instituted as a regular body by Marius, though the name was used before his time with a less definite Signification.
  • n. Hence A band or body of warriors in general.
  • n. In some systems of botanical and zoölogical classification, a large group of no definitely fixed grade.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a band of warriors (originally a unit of a Roman Legion)
  • n. a group of people having approximately the same age
  • n. a company of companions or supporters

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French cohorte, from Latin cohors, cohort-; see gher-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin cohors (stem cohort-), perhaps via Old French cohorte. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Specifically, when you have cases in which one cohort quite blatantly loots the local treasury and then another cohort is asked to make up for the shortfall, it is is natural for the second cohort to object.

    Matthew Yglesias » The Looming Public Pension Disaster

  • But if higher marriage rates among women in the cohort is a fact, it seems to be a fact that should get a lot of attention.

    Matthew Yglesias » Endgame

  • This cohort is as Republican as Republican gets: no group is more conservative on moral values, economic issues, or foreign policy.

    Tribal Relations

  • We need what we call cohort training, where units train together, you know, as they would respond to an event.

    CNN Transcript Sep 11, 2003

  • We also get a little more granular in what we call our cohort retention rate, which is the individual retention rate of each new class of new students that come in.

  • We also get a little more granular in what we call our cohort retention rate, which is the individual retention rate of each new class of new students would come in, that was also down slightly Karl, but there was something on our remedial classes, our developmental classes wasn't there.

  • Marci Bonham chose the global executive M.B.A. program at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business because 60% of the cohort is non-American.

    Peer to Peer

  • Once again cohort studies (the same kind of potentially biased research that led to the conclusion that flu vaccine cuts mortality by 50 percent) are behind these claims.

    Does the Vaccine Matter?

  • To get a rough idea of whether these improvements were real – or were, at least partially, a result of the change in cohort demographics (the shift was even stronger among NAEP test-takers) – we can check the changes in average scores for different subgroups.

    Rhee's testing legacy: An open question

  • Climate and population density induce long-term cohort variation in a northern ungulate.

    Climate change and reindeer nomadism in Finnmark, Norway

Comments

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  • So to decimate a legion would be to remove a cohort?

    January 6, 2008

  • A legion of Wordies marching through the dictionary.

    1422, from L. cohortem, acc. of cohors "enclosure," meaning extended to "infantry company" in Roman army (a tenth part of a legion) through notion of "enclosed group, retinue," from com- "with" + root akin to hortus "garden," from PIE *ghr-ti-, from base *gher- "to grasp, enclose" (see yard (1)). Sense of "accomplice" is first recorded 1952, Amer.Eng.

    January 6, 2008