Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A group or band of people.
  • noun A companion or associate.
  • noun A generational group as defined in demographics, statistics, or market research.
  • noun One of the 10 divisions of a Roman legion, consisting of 300 to 600 men.
  • noun A group of soldiers.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Roman antiquity, an infantry division of the legion, instituted as a regular body by Marius, though the name was used before his time with a less definite Signification.
  • noun Hence A band or body of warriors in general.
  • noun In some systems of botanical and zoölogical classification, a large group of no definitely fixed grade.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Rom. Antiq.) A body of about five or six hundred soldiers; the tenth part of a legion.
  • noun Any band or body of warriors.
  • noun (Bot.) A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A group of people supporting the same thing or person.
  • noun statistics A demographic grouping of people, especially those in a defined age group, or having a common characteristic.
  • noun military, history Any division of a Roman legion, normally of about 500 men.
  • noun An accomplice; abettor; associate.
  • noun Any band or body of warriors.
  • noun botany A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.
  • noun A colleague.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a band of warriors (originally a unit of a Roman Legion)
  • noun a group of people having approximately the same age
  • noun a company of companions or supporters

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French cohorte, from Latin cohors, cohort-; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin cohors (stem cohort-), perhaps via Old French cohorte.

Examples

    Sorry, no example sentences found.

Comments

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  • A legion of Wordies marching through the dictionary.

    1422, from L. cohortem, acc. of cohors "enclosure," meaning extended to "infantry company" in Roman army (a tenth part of a legion) through notion of "enclosed group, retinue," from com- "with" + root akin to hortus "garden," from PIE *ghr-ti-, from base *gher- "to grasp, enclose" (see yard (1)). Sense of "accomplice" is first recorded 1952, Amer.Eng.

    January 6, 2008

  • So to decimate a legion would be to remove a cohort?

    January 6, 2008