Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One that qualifies, especially one that has or fulfills all appropriate qualifications, as for a position, office, or task.
  • noun Grammar A word or phrase that qualifies, limits, or modifies the meaning of another word or phrase.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who or that which qualifies; that which modifies, reduces, tempers, or restrains; specifically, in grammar, a word that qualifies another, as an adjective a noun, or an adverb a verb, etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who, or that which, qualifies; that which modifies, reduces, tempers or restrains.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun One who qualifies for something, especially a contestant who qualifies for a stage in a competition.
  • noun A preliminary stage of a competition.
  • noun grammar A word or phrase, such as an adjective or adverb, that describes or characterizes another word or phrase, such as a noun or verb; a modifier; that adds or subtracts attributes to another.
  • noun computing, programming A marker that qualifies or modifies another code element.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a content word that qualifies the meaning of a noun or verb
  • noun a contestant who meets certain requirements and so qualifies to take part in the next stage of competition

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • * Thanks, Jayack, for reminding me that a qualifier is needed.

    The D.C. Madam - Swampland - TIME.com

  • Also, the final, additional qualifier is suspicious, too -- "for political advantage."

    Balkinization

  • And I say again that where you have fiscal mismanagement the mismanagement will occur whether the levy qualifier is 50% + 1, 60%, or 99%.

    Sound Politics: Eliminating accountability ... for the children!

  • This means that Dummett's "never" qualifier is unnecessary, and thus your objection to my argument breaks down.

    Backing Into an Evidentiary Standard for ID

  • The only qualifier is a 32hr work week, and it makes no distinction between the AVERAGE woman working 10hrs a week less than men, nor does it take into account such things as women taking time off for having children (averaged 5yrs out of career) nor does it take into account that the AVERAGE woman tends to retire at a younger than men.

    Guilty pleasures. « A Bird’s Nest

  • Also, the final, additional qualifier is suspicious, too -- "for political advantage."

    Balkinization

  • Also, the final, additional qualifier is suspicious, too -- "for political advantage."

    Balkinization

  • Also, the final, additional qualifier is suspicious, too -- "for political advantage."

    Balkinization

  • Also, the final, additional qualifier is suspicious, too -- "for political advantage."

    Balkinization

  • Also, the final, additional qualifier is suspicious, too -- "for political advantage."

    Balkinization

Comments

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