Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A flat, usually rectangular piece of stiff paper, cardboard, or plastic, especially.
  • noun One of a set or pack bearing significant numbers, symbols, or figures, used in games and in divination.
  • noun A greeting card.
  • noun A postcard.
  • noun One bearing a person's name and other information, used for purposes of identification or classification.
  • noun One bearing the image and often the statistics of a sports figure.
  • noun A business card.
  • noun A credit card.
  • noun A magnetic card.
  • noun One used for recording information in a file.
  • noun A game played with cards.
  • noun The playing of games with cards.
  • noun A program, especially for a sports event.
  • noun A menu, as in a restaurant.
  • noun A wine list.
  • noun A printed circuit board that plugs into a slot on a computer's motherboard or into a port on the outside of a device, and performs a particular function, such as data storage or converting and processing signals for communication with other devices.
  • noun A punch card.
  • noun A compass card.
  • noun Informal An eccentrically amusing person.
  • noun Something, such as an advantageous circumstance or tactical maneuver, that can be used to help gain an objective. Often used with play:
  • noun An appeal to a specified issue or argument, usually one involving strong emotions. Often used with play:
  • transitive verb To furnish with or attach to a card.
  • transitive verb To list (something) on a card; catalog.
  • transitive verb To check the identification of, especially in order to verify legal age.
  • transitive verb Sports To warn or eject (a soccer player who has committed a flagrant foul) by showing a yellow card or a red card.
  • idiom (card up (one's) sleeve) A secret resource or plan held in reserve.
  • idiom (in the cards) Likely or certain to happen.
  • idiom (put/lay) To make frank and clear revelation, as of one's motives or intentions.
  • noun A wire-toothed brush or a machine fitted with rows of wire teeth, used to straighten and separate fibers, as of wool, prior to spinning.
  • noun A device used to raise the nap on a fabric.
  • transitive verb To comb out or brush with a card.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To comb or open, as wool, flax, hemp, etc., with a card, for the purpose of disentangling the fibers, cleansing from extraneous matter, separating the coarser parts, and making fine and soft for spinning.
  • To mingle; mix; weaken or debase by mixing.
  • noun A brush with wire teeth, used in disentangling fibers of wool, flax, or cotton, and laying them parallel to one another preparatory to spinning.
  • noun A carding-machine.
  • noun A currycomb made from a piece of card-clothing.
  • noun An abbreviation of cardinal.
  • To play at cards.
  • noun A paper; a writing; a chart; a map.
  • noun A piece of thick paper or pasteboard prepared for various purposes.
  • noun A piece of cardboard on which is written or printed the name, or the name, address, etc., of the person presenting it, as in making a social visit, announcing the nature and place of one's business, etc. Cards intended for the former use are called visiting-cards. and for the latter business cards.
  • noun A paper on which the points of the compass are marked: used with a movable magnetic needle to form a compass. See compass and compass-card.
  • noun A piece of pasteboard or heavy note-paper on which is written or printed an invitation to a public or private entertainment, especially an invitation to or announcement of a wedding.
  • noun A short advertisement of one's business, or a personal statement of any kind, in a newspaper or other periodical.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English carde, from Old French carte, from Latin charta, paper made from papyrus, from Greek khartēs.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English carde, from Medieval Latin cardus, from Latin carduus, thistle.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English carde ("playing card"), from Old French carte, from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek χάρτης (chartēs, "paper, papyrus").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French carde, from Old Provençal carda, deverbal from cardar, from Late Latin *carito, from Latin carrere ("to comb with a card"), from Proto-Indo-European *ker, *sker (“to cut”).

Examples

Comments

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  • as a witty amusing person who makes jokes

    February 24, 2008

  • CArD

    May 10, 2008

  • "12. A brush with wire teeth, used in disentangling fibers of wool, flax, or cotton, and laying them parallel to one another preparatory to spinning. In hand-cards the wires are short and are passed slantingly through leather, which is then nailed upon a board. Two of these brushes are used, one in each hand, and in use are drawn past each other, the fibers being between them. In the carding-machine, which has superseded hand-carding, the cards are formed by hard-drawn wire staples, each furnishing two teeth, drawn through leather and bent at a certain angle. The material thus prepared is called card-clothing. See carding-machine."

    --Century Dictionary

    January 19, 2011

  • Yes, its true

    June 3, 2012