Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See lasso.
  • n. A rope for picketing grazing horses or mules.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a lasso
  • n. a tether
  • n. An attack where the wrestler runs towards an opponent, wraps his arm around their upper chest and neck and then forces them to the ground.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A long, slender rope made of hemp or strips of hide, esp. one with a noose; -- used as a lasso for catching cattle, horses, etc., and for picketing a horse so that he can graze without wandering.
  • transitive v. To secure with a lariat fastened to a stake, as a horse or mule for grazing; also, to lasso or catch with a lariat.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A rope or cord used for picketing horses while grazing.
  • n. A thong or noose used for catching wild animals: called in California, Mexico, and further south a lasso. Also called reata, often spelled riata.
  • To catch or fasten with a lariat; lasso.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a long noosed rope used to catch animals

Etymologies

Spanish la reata : la, the (from Latin illa; see al-1 in Indo-European roots) + reatar, to tie again (re-, again from Latin; see re- + atar, to tie from Latin aptāre, to join, from aptus, past participle of apere, to tie).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Spanish la reata ‘the lasso’. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Our word lariat comes from this Mexican word with the definite article prefixed and the final vowel dropped.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XVIII No 4

  • I just know that its supposed to be called a lariat, not lasso.

    WB (STILL) HATES CHICKS, WONDER WOMAN

  • The Indians had copied saddles, stirrups, the crupper, and the lariat from the Spanish explorers, who, in turn had borrowed these innovations from the Moors Arabic people from North Africa, who had previously occupied Spain for 500 years.

    Diffusion of Innovations

  • The lariat is a string of pearls and trinkets that's long enough to wrap around her neck several times, and Ms. Takagi knots it in different ways to match her style.

    The Right Necklace for Your Clothes

  • The lariat is a string of pearls and trinkets that is long enough to wrap around her neck several times, and Ms. Takagi knots it in different ways to match her style.

    A new take on necklaces

  • The lariat is a great way to complement a top or dress that features a V-neck, a plunging neckline, or a deep-cut wrap opening, as the shape of a traditional lariat falls along the same shape gently over the chest.

    Before You Put That On

  • The Indians had copied saddles, stirrups, the crupper, and the lariat from the Spanish explorers, who in turn had borrowed these innovations from the Moors Arabic people from North Africa, who had previously occupied Spain for seven hundred years.

    Diffusion of Innovations

  • Each of the cowboys carried his rope, for of late it had seemed as though a lariat might be a very necessary accompaniment to these side hunts.

    The Outdoor Chums After Big Game Or, Perilous Adventures in the Wilderness

  • A lariat is a fifty foot line with a running noose at one end and made from the hide of various animals.

    Dangers of the Trail in 1865 A Narrative of Actual Events

  • I have often wondered why "the rope" -- as our western cowboys call the lariat, and the Mexican lariata -- has not become a national sport, for its proper use requires great skill, and it is distinctly an American institution.

    Healthful Sports for Boys

Comments

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  • Her eyes throw black lariats
    one for his head,
    one for his heels—
    and the beast lies vanquished—
    walls still,
    streams still,
    except for a tarn,
    or is it a pool,
    or is it a whirlpool
    twitching with memory?

    - Alfred Kreymborg, 'Dorothy'.

    September 21, 2009