Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One of an ancient Celtic order of minstrel poets who composed and recited verses celebrating the legendary exploits of chieftains and heroes.
  • n. A poet, especially a lyric poet.
  • n. A piece of armor used to protect or ornament a horse.
  • transitive v. To equip (a horse) with bards.
  • transitive v. To cover (meat) in thin pieces of bacon or fat to preserve moisture during cooking.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
  • n. Hence: A poet; as, the bard of Avon.
  • n. A piece of defensive (or, sometimes, ornamental) armor for a horse's neck, breast, and flanks; a barb. (Often in the plural.)
  • n. Defensive armor formerly worn by a man at arms.
  • n. A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat or game.
  • n. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
  • n. Specifically, Peruvian bark.
  • v. To cover a horse in defensive armor.
  • v. To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
  • n. Hence: A poet.
  • n. A piece of defensive (or, sometimes, ornamental) armor for a horse's neck, breast, and flanks; a barb. [Often in the pl.]
  • n. Defensive armor formerly worn by a man at arms.
  • n. A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat or game.
  • transitive v. To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.
  • n. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
  • n. Specifically, Peruvian bark.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A poet and singer among the ancient Celts; one whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men, and on other subjects, generally to the accompaniment of the harp.
  • n. Formerly, in Scotland, a strolling musician; a minstrel: classed with vagabonds, as an object of penal laws.
  • n. In modern use, a poet: as, the bard of Avon (Shakspere); the Ayrshire bard (Burns).
  • n.
  • n. A scold: applied only to women.
  • n. Any one of the pieces of defensive armor used in medieval Europe to protect the horse.
  • n. Hence plural The housings of a horse, used in tourneys, justs, and processions during the later middle ages. They were most commonly of stuff woven or embroidered with the arms of the rider.
  • n. plural Armor of metal plates, worn in the sixteenth century and later. See armor.
  • To caparison with bards, as a horse; to furnish or accoutre with armor, as a man.
  • n. A strip of bacon used to cover a fowl or meat in roasting.
  • To cover with thin bacon, as a bird or meat to be roasted.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a lyric poet
  • v. put a caparison on
  • n. an ornamental caparison for a horse

Etymologies

Middle English, from Irish and Scottish Gaelic bard and from Welsh bardd; see gwerə-2 in Indo-European roots.
Middle English barde, from Old French, from Old Italian barda, from Arabic barda'a, packsaddle, from Persian pardah; see purdah.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
A 15th century loan of Scottish Gaelic bard. (Wiktionary)
From French barde. English since the late 15th century. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • JM knows that hanging out with a poet is keeping bard company.

    August 26, 2011

  • The famous woofing poets of the Andes...arrff!

    March 10, 2011

  • specifically, a Peruvian bark - Webster's 1913 Dictionary

    March 10, 2011

  • town in kentucky renown for its spirit, bardstown. its not drab.

    February 8, 2009

  • T. Eliot, top bard, notes putrid tang emanating, is sad. I'd assign it a name: gnat dirt upset on drab pot-toilet.

    October 18, 2008

  • BARD - (verb) - Past tense of the infinitive "to borrow."
    Usage: "My brother bard my pickup truck."

    April 8, 2008

  • Drab in reverse.

    July 22, 2007