Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An Old English poet or bard.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A poet or minstrel in Anglo-Saxon England.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Old English.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English scop (died out in Middle English, but revived in the 18th century).

Examples

  • The problem with "scop" to me is that the reader will tend to think it's pronounced as "skop" - even if you have an appendix/note explaining OE spelling conventions.

    Archaic terminology in historical fiction

  • Would English-speaking life today be somewhat different had words like wuldor, scop, dryhten, hyge, and līc or “glory,” “poet-singer,” “lord,” “thought,” and “body” survived as well?

    The English Is Coming!

  • The list is obviusly a large idea to tackle since in the scop of film history their has been so many God awful sequels.

    Top 10 Worst Sequels » Scene-Stealers

  • Going to get, going to Gun Shop and try to find a base I need to mount the scop on the Slug gun.

    The Little Soldier from Texas

  • Aelfhere seems to be a scop, called skald, in this story, singing the tale of Beowulf for his grandson.

    Saving Beowulf

  • He'd taken the drug to blunt SAS, nausea, but the stimulants the manufacturer included to counter the scop had no effect on his doctored system.

    Wonder Woman and the Lasso of Truth

  • This holiday season, you can test your story-telling skills against your friends and loved ones, and for once -- perhaps disappointing those of us who took the time to learn Siever's half-line types in the hopes of a future career as a scop*** -- meter doesn't count.

    Archive 2007-12-01

  • He could have been a skald of old, a scop, an Egil Skallagrimsson weaving such a tale of words that Eric Bloodax, his captor, allowed him to live.

    Vineyard Chill

  • In a way this perhaps mirrors the experience of the storytellers of old – a Welsh bard getting up to recount The Dream of Macsen Wledig or an English scop reciting Beowulf must have recognised that most of the audience already knew the ending.

    Merlin Trilogy, by Mary Stewart. Book review

  • The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of scop as OE. scop, sceop = OHG. scoph, scof masc., cogn. w.

    A grain of truth?

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Thanks, qms, but yours are always better.

    I'm beginning to wonder whether your initials stand for Quite Masterful Scop (or some such).

    September 28, 2018

  • Well done, zuzu!

    September 28, 2018

  • Oh, fun! I had a copy of Grendel when I was a kid, so I have a sentimental fondness for the monster.

    In his novel take on the plot

    John Gardner's hero was not

    A prince or a poet

    But (wouldn't you know it)

    The beast--who finally gets caught.

    September 27, 2018

  • In Heorot he gave them all hope,

    At least a bare method to cope.

    Now hear Grendel’s roar

    At our trembling door

    But where is our comforting scop?

    Note: Pronunciation guidance varies: skop, shop and shope. The last of these is the one I was taught by scholars I trust.

    September 27, 2018

  • scop just the bard facts

    January 14, 2007