Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To neigh softly.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Pound sterling.
  • n. A soft neighing sound characteristic of a horse.
  • v. To make a soft neighing sound characteristic of a horse.
  • n. One of the night brawlers of London formerly noted for breaking windows with halfpence.
  • n. The cutting lip which projects downward at the edge of a boring bit and cuts a circular groove in the wood to limit the size of the hole that is bored.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of the night brawlers of London formerly noted for breaking windows with half-pence.
  • n. The cutting lip which projects downward at the edge of a boring bit and cuts a circular groove in the wood to limit the size of the hole that is bored.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A demon of the water; a water-sprite; a nix or nixy.
  • n. One who or that which nicks.
  • n. One of a company of brawlers who in the early part of the eighteenth century roamed about London by night, amusing themselves with breaking people's windows.
  • n. A kind of marble for children's play.
  • To neigh.
  • To laugh with half-suppressed catches of the voice; snigger.
  • n. A neigh; also, a vulgar laugh.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the characteristic sounds made by a horse
  • v. make a characteristic sound, of a horse

Etymologies

Perhaps alteration of neigher, nicher, frequentative of neigh.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
nick +‎ -er (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The terms nicker for a one-pound note and half a nicker for a ten-shilling note are New Zealand expressions that arrived in Britain, and they were also widely used by counterfeiters in the underworld.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XIX No 4

  • -- A tropical plant, bearing the seeds known as nicker nuts, or bonduc nuts.

    Catalogue of Economic Plants in the Collection of the U. S. Department of Agriculture

  • Brown's "nicker" without acknowledgment, and lost it.

    Tom, Dick and Harry

  • He broke off at sound of the unmistakable nicker of

    CHAPTER XXV

  • A sudden, joyous nicker from without put the match between the pages of the frog book, and, while Oh

    CHAPTER I

  • My proceeded partly to dress his master in bed, including socks and shoes, the master, twisting partly on his side, stared out in the direction of the nicker.

    CHAPTER I

  • The air was heavy with lilac fragrance, and from the distance, as he rode between the lilac hedges, Graham heard the throaty nicker of Mountain

    CHAPTER XVIII

  • Her approach elicited another resonant nicker from Rune, and when she set the basket at his feet he eagerly tore into the grain.

    Raven Speak

  • From far, far above came a familiar nicker, one shadowed with worry.

    Raven Speak

  • Between his labored breaths, he managed a soft nicker, a depositing of his trust in her.

    Raven Speak

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.