Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An ornamental covering or harness for a horse; a caparison. Often used in the plural.
  • n. Articles of dress or adornment, especially accessories.
  • n. Characteristic or symbolic signs: all the trappings of power.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of trap.
  • n. An instance of ensnaring something or someone.
  • n. An ornamental covering or harness for a horse; caparison.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The art. business, or method of a trapper, in any sense.
  • n. In drainage: The process of furnishing with a trap or traps.
  • n. Same as trap, 4; also, traps collectively.
  • n. The cutting of a brilliant in the form known as trap-brilliant. See brilliant.
  • n. The housing or harness of a horse, when somewhat ornamental in character; hence, external ornamentation, as of dress: generally in the plural.
  • n. Synonyms Accoutrements, equipments, paraphernalia, gear, decorations, frippery.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. stable gear consisting of a decorated covering for a horse, especially (formerly) for a warhorse

Etymologies

From trap. (Wiktionary)
Middle English trap, trappe ("personal belongings, owndom, household goods") (compare Middle English trappen "to deck, caparison"), of uncertain origin. Possibly from Anglo-Norman, from Medieval Latin trapus ("cloth"), from Frankish *traba, trapa ("cloth, thread, rag"), from Proto-Germanic *trabō, *trafan, *trēb (“fringe, rags”), from Proto-Indo-European *drāp-, *drāb- (“rag”). Akin to Old High German traba ("fringe, tatters, thread"), Old Norse traf ("headscarf"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.