Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The composer of an elegy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A writer of funeral songs; one who writes in elegiac verse.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A write of elegies.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A writer of elegies.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the author of a mournful poem lamenting the dead

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And of all those writers—Zweig, Musil, Schnitzler, Kafka, Hofmannsthal, Kraus, Canetti, the list goes on—the supreme elegist of the Dual Monarchy was Joseph Roth.

    Dispatches From a Lost Empire

  • Two young women were in attendance, as was — in spirit only — William Cullen Bryant, poetical elegist of an Indian maiden thwarted in love who, legend said, had thrown herself off a precipice of this same mountain.

    January « 2010 « poetry dispatch & other notes from the underground

  • The elegist of one of her daughters by an earlier marriage referred to her flatteringly as “sweet mother Scribonia.”

    Caesars’ Wives

  • He can sound like the elegist of rural old imperial England, but he can sting in the present tense too, on matters from Princess Di to the \ "scream of rocket-burn\" in the war on Iraq.

    Christopher Lydon: Sir Andrew Motion: poetry that looks like water and bites like gin

  • He can sound like the elegist of rural old imperial England, but he can sting in the present tense too, on matters from Princess Di to the "scream of rocket-burn" in the war on Iraq.

    Christopher Lydon: Sir Andrew Motion: poetry that looks like water and bites like gin

  • Euripides was a contemporary of Sophocles but not a politician himself; he was an occasional diplomat and elegist of the glorious dead, but his dyspeptic feelings about the world — during a war against Sparta that Athens was beginning to lose — are clear from all his plays, not least this last of Carson's trilogy.

    Peter Stothard - Times Online - WBLG:

  • What if the elegist fled his fame, and then had to face one last request for a poem, a request he could neither honor nor ignore...

    Elegiacal

  • Immediately, a character sprang into mind: a professional elegist, someone who gained great fame from writing elegies, a popular poet in the mold of Edgar Guest.

    Archive 2007-12-01

  • His transformation into an elegist of the martyrs in such poems as "Easter, 1916," "Sixteen Dead Men," and "The Rose Tree" thus has a particular strangeness.

    Second Puberty

  • There were two inquisitors more relentless than the others; first, the little scrubby fellow who claimed for his share all the houris of a Mussulman's palace; another, the great elegist from the provinces.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.