Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To growl viciously while baring the teeth.
  • intransitive v. To speak angrily or threateningly.
  • transitive v. To utter with anger or hostility: snarled a retort.
  • n. A vicious growl.
  • n. A vicious, hostile utterance.
  • n. A tangled mass, as of hair or yarn.
  • n. A confused, complicated, or tangled situation; a predicament.
  • intransitive v. To become tangled or confused.
  • transitive v. To tangle or knot (hair, for example).
  • transitive v. To confuse; complicate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty.
  • n. The act of snarling; a growl; a surly or peevish expression; an angry contention.
  • n. A growl, as of an angry or surly dog, or similar; grumbling sounds
  • v. To form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.
  • v. To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots; as, to snarl a skein of thread.
  • v. To embarrass; to insnare.
  • v. To growl, as an angry or surly dog; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds.
  • v. To speak crossly; to talk in rude, surly terms.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.
  • transitive v. To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots.
  • transitive v. To embarrass; to insnare.
  • n. A knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty.
  • intransitive v. To growl, as an angry or surly dog; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds.
  • intransitive v. To speak crossly; to talk in rude, surly terms.
  • n. The act of snarling; a growl; a surly or peevish expression; an angry contention.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To growl sharply, as an angry or surly dog; gnarl.
  • Figuratively, to speak in a sharp and quarrelsome or faultfinding way; talk rudely or churlishly; snap.
  • To utter with a snarl: as, to snarl one's discontent; to snarl out an oath.
  • n. A sharp growl; also, a jealous, quarrelsome, or faultfinding utterance, like the snarling of a dog or a wolf.
  • To entangle; complicate; involve in knots: as, to snarl a skein of thread.
  • To embarrass; confuse; entangle.
  • To shape or ornament the exterior of (vessels of thin metal) by repercussion from within. See snarling-iron.
  • To make tangles or snarls; also, to become entangled.
  • n. A snare; any knot or complication of hair, thread, etc., which it is difficult to disentangle; also, a group of things resembling, in entanglement, such a knot: as, a snarl of yachts.
  • n. Figuratively, complication; intricacy; embarrassing condition: as, to get the negotiation into a snarl.
  • n. A vexatious controversy; a squabble. This sense may have been affected by snarl.
  • n. A knot in wood; a gnarl.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make a snarling noise or move with a snarling noise
  • n. an angry vicious expression
  • v. twist together or entwine into a confusing mass
  • n. something jumbled or confused
  • v. utter in an angry, sharp, or abrupt tone
  • v. make more complicated or confused through entanglements
  • n. a vicious angry growl

Etymologies

Frequentative of obsolete snar, perhaps from Dutch or Low German snarren, to rattle, probably of imitative origin.
Middle English snarle, trap, probably diminutive of snare; see snare1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English snarlen, frequentative of snare. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The air-traffic snarl from the Icelandic volcano has transformed Spain's capital and its airport into Europe's unofficial hub, as travelers grow desperate to reach their destinations.

    Madrid Takes on Role of Hub

  • It appears that many of the commentors use “neoconservative” as somewhat of a portmanteau snarl-word: the issue at discussion is the extent the snarl aspect applies to or is caused by Jews, either as individuals or as a collective.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Joe Klein Again

  • We're still very much in "snarl mode", but we have managed to find a picture of Blair looking at his equipment.

    Praise indeed

  • A good snarl from the heart is never tedious. (tis out August 5th, btw ... or sometime next year if yer in the US) duanawitch: I shall munch on your cookie with some milk to calm my bilious stomach.

    Duh, Tell Us About The Rabbits, George

  • The intent of the snarl is to warn or frighten, and judgment is required to know when it should be used.

    The Outcast

  • He bellied cautiously inside and was met by a warning snarl from the she-wolf.

    The Lair

  • There was a murmuring and a snarl from the tribespeople, a flashing of knives from the sheaths and a clicking of rusting guns.

    The "Fuzziness" of Hoockla-Heen

  • By SARA SCHAEFER MUñOZ And JONATHAN HOUSE MADRID-The air-traffic snarl from the Icelandic volcano has transformed Spain's capital and its airport into Europe's unofficial hub, as travelers grow desperate to reach their financial compensation for the closure of airspace.

    WN.com - Articles related to British Airways, Spain's Iberia sign merger deal

  • Shelby made a sound that could only be described as a snarl and ran toward Cypher.

    The Overload Protocol

  • May 30, 2009 at 6:28 AM just FYI this isn't offical growl stuff. a much more mature windows rendition of growl is called snarl, and is in its 3rd or 4th version, you can learn more about it here: www.fullphat.net

    Growl For Windows Updates, Adds Gmail Notifications | Lifehacker Australia

Comments

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  • "The little painted horses stopped shifty and truculent and a vicious snarl of flies fought constantly in the bed of the gamewagon."

    --Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy

    April 18, 2009