Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To involve or connect intimately or incriminatingly: evidence that implicates others in the plot.
  • transitive v. To have as a consequence or necessary circumstance; imply or entail: His evasiveness implicated complicity.
  • transitive v. Linguistics To convey, imply, or suggest by implicature.
  • transitive v. Archaic To interweave or entangle; entwine.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To connect or involve in an unfavorable or criminal way with something.
  • v. To imply, to have as a necessary consequence or accompaniment.
  • v. To fold or twist together, intertwine, interlace, entangle, entwine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To infold; to fold together; to interweave.
  • transitive v. To bring into connection with; to involve; to connect; -- applied to persons, in an unfavorable sense

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To infold or fold over; involve; entangle.
  • To cause to be affected; show to be concerned or have a part; bring into connection or relation: with by, in, or with: as, the disease implicates other organs; the evidence implicates several persons in the crime.
  • Synonyms Implicate, Involve, Entangle. Implicate and involve are similar words, but with a marked difference. The first means to fold into a thing; the second, to roll into it. What is folded, however, may be folded but once or partially; what is involved is rolled many times. Hence, men are said to be implicated when they are only under suspicion, or have taken but a small share in a transaction; they are said to be involved when they are deeply concerned. In this sense implicate is always used of persons; involve may be used of persons or things; both words being always metaphorically employed. Entangle is used either literally or metaphorically, and signifies to involve so that extrication is a matter of extreme difficulty.
  • n. The thing implied; that which results from implication.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. impose, involve, or imply as a necessary accompaniment or result
  • v. bring into intimate and incriminating connection

Etymologies

Middle English, to convey a truth bound up in a fable, from Latin implicāre, implicāt-, to entangle, unite : in-, in, + plicāre, to fold.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin implico ("entangle, involve"), from plico ("fold") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • He demands that we learn to regard matter and life as a whole, coherent domain, which he calls the implicate order

    THAT Animeblog

  • He dubbed the implicate order an undivided holistic realm that is beyond concepts like space-time, matter, or energy.

    ENTANGLED MINDS

  • 'Credit cards, calls implicate Mossad in Dubai killing'

    WN.com - Articles related to French PM: Mideast peace boosts Syria economy

  • The U.N. investigation into this crime does not even mention Mr. Zuhair, let alone "implicate" him.

    Letters

  • In other words, using this as an excuse to kind of implicate them, to create problems for their ex-husbands.

    CNN Transcript Feb 16, 2009

  • These dangerous sequelæ are liable to follow infection of any scalp wound, but more especially such as implicate the sub-aponeurotic area, or the pericranium.

    Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities—Head—Neck. Sixth Edition.

  • Grice introduced the technical terms implicate and implicature for the case in which what the speaker meant, implied, or suggested is distinct from what the speaker said. [

    Implicature

  • They surely should not be able to have her claim against them dismissed on the ground that her secret status might implicate sensitive information.

    The Conservative Assault on the Constitution

  • Tahir proved to have a remarkable memory when it came to aspects of the inquiry that did not implicate him.

    Fallout

  • While he waited, he began carefully erasing records from his computer that could implicate him in the production of nuclear technology.

    Fallout

Comments

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  • I tried a tortilla involved with salsa and chilli beans. My feeling though is that they are far better implicated with guacamole.

    April 5, 2011

  • What a beautiful definition.

    April 4, 2011

  • "Implicate and involve are similar words, but with a marked difference. The first means to fold into a thing; the second, to roll into it. What is folded, however, may be folded but once or partially; what is involved is rolled many times. Hence, men are said to be implicated when they are only under suspicion, or have taken but a small share in a transaction; they are said to be involved when they are deeply concerned. . . ."
    --Century Dictionary

    April 4, 2011

  • "...a new notion of order, that may be appropriate to a universe of unbroken wholeness. This is the implicate or enfolded order. In the enfolded order space and time are no longer the dominant factors determining the relationships of the dependence or independence of different elements. Rather, an entirely different sort of basic connection of elements is possible from which our ordinary notions of space and time, along with those of separately existent material particles, are abstracted as forms derived from the deeper order. These ordinary notions in fact appear in what is called the explicate or unfolded order, which is a special and distinguished form contained within the general totality of all the implicate orders."

    Wholeness and the Implicate Order by Jacob Bohm, p.xv of Introduction

    August 4, 2008