Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An area of wet, soggy, muddy ground; a bog.
  • noun Deep slimy soil or mud.
  • noun A disadvantageous or difficult condition or situation.
  • intransitive verb To cause to sink or become stuck in mire.
  • intransitive verb To hinder, entrap, or entangle.
  • intransitive verb To soil with mud or mire.
  • intransitive verb To sink or become stuck in mire.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Wet, slimy soil of some depth and of yielding consistence; deep mud.
  • noun Filth.
  • To plunge and fix in mire; set or stall in mud; sink in mud or in a morass.
  • To soil or daub with slimy mud or foul matter.
  • To sink in mud; especially, to sink so deep as to be unable to move forward; stick in the mud.
  • To wonder; admire.
  • noun An ant. See pismire.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete An ant.
  • noun Deep mud; wet, spongy earth.
  • noun (Zoöl.), [Prov. Eng.] the pewit, or laughing gull.
  • noun [Prov. Eng.] the European bittern.
  • intransitive verb To stick in mire.
  • transitive verb To cause or permit to stick fast in mire; to plunge or fix in mud.
  • transitive verb To stick or entangle; to involve in difficulties; -- often used in the passive or predicate form.
  • transitive verb To soil with mud or foul matter.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete An ant.
  • noun Deep mud; moist, spongy earth.
  • noun An undesirable situation, a predicament.
  • verb To weigh down.
  • verb Cause to become stuck in mud.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun deep soft mud in water or slush
  • noun a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
  • verb entrap
  • verb be unable to move further
  • verb cause to get stuck as if in a mire
  • noun a difficulty or embarrassment that is hard to extricate yourself from
  • verb soil with mud, muck, or mire

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old Norse mȳrr, bog.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Perhaps related to Middle Dutch miere (Dutch mier). Cognate with Old Norse maurr, Danish myre.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old Norse mýrr, from Proto-Germanic *miuzijō, whence also Swedish myr, Icelandic mýri, Dutch *mier (in placenames, for example Mierlo). Related to Proto-Germanic *meusan, whence Old English mēos, and Proto-Germanic *musan, whence Old English mos (English moss).

Examples

Comments

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  • Re etymological roots, see also mushroom.

    April 11, 2018