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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To contain as a part; include.
  • transitive v. To have as a necessary feature or consequence; entail: was told that the job would involve travel. See Synonyms at include.
  • transitive v. To engage as a participant; embroil: involved the bystanders in his dispute with the police.
  • transitive v. To connect closely and often incriminatingly; implicate: evidence that involved the governor in the scandal.
  • transitive v. To influence or affect: The matter is serious because it involves your reputation.
  • transitive v. To occupy or engage the interest of: a story that completely involved me for the rest of the evening.
  • transitive v. To make complex or intricate; complicate.
  • transitive v. To wrap; envelop: a castle that was involved in mist.
  • transitive v. Archaic To wind or coil about.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To roll or fold up; to wind round; to entwine.
  • v. To envelop completely; to surround; to cover; to hide; to involve in darkness or obscurity.
  • v. To complicate or make intricate, as in grammatical structure.
  • v. To connect with something as a natural or logical consequence or effect; to include necessarily; to imply.
  • v. To take in; to gather in; to mingle confusedly; to blend or merge.
  • v. To envelop, infold, entangle, or embarrass; as, to involve a person in debt or misery.
  • v. To engage thoroughly; to occupy, employ, or absorb.
  • v. To raise to any assigned power; to multiply, as a quantity, into itself a given number of times; as, a quantity involved to the third or fourth power.
  • v. Status: involved

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To roll or fold up; to wind round; to entwine.
  • transitive v. To envelop completely; to surround; to cover; to hide; to involve in darkness or obscurity.
  • transitive v. To complicate or make intricate, as in grammatical structure.
  • transitive v. To connect with something as a natural or logical consequence or effect; to include necessarily; to imply.
  • transitive v. To take in; to gather in; to mingle confusedly; to blend or merge.
  • transitive v. To envelop, infold, entangle, or embarrass.
  • transitive v. To engage thoroughly; to occupy, employ, or absorb.
  • transitive v. To raise to any assigned power; to multiply, as a quantity, into itself a given number of times.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To roll or fold in or wrap up so as to conceal; envelop on all sides; cover completely; infold; specifically, in zoology, to encircle completely: as, a mark involving a joint; wings involving the body.
  • To entwine; entangle; implicate; bring into entanglement or complication, literally or figuratively: as, an involved problem; to involve a nation in war; to be involved in debt.
  • To bring into a common relation or connection; hence, to include as a necessary or logical consequence; imply; comprise.
  • In arithmetic and algebra, to raise to any assigned power; multiply, as a quantity, into itself a given number of times: as, a quantity involved to the third or fourth power.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. occupy or engage the interest of
  • v. have as a necessary feature
  • v. make complex or intricate or complicated
  • v. connect closely and often incriminatingly
  • v. engage as a participant
  • v. contain as a part
  • v. require as useful, just, or proper

Etymologies

Middle English involven, from Latin involvere, to enwrap : in-, in; see in-2 + volvere, to roll, turn; see wel-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin involvere. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And you can pretty well summarize the next three Habits with the expression "involve others in the problem and work out the solution together."

    Living the 7 Habits

  • Cases to be heard this term involve immigration, affirmative action, gay marriage and health care.

    NPR Topics: News

  • While Rice justifies her decision by saying the book will have a definite Christian framework and a focus on the theme of redemption, she admits that the future chronicle will once again involve the character Lestat and a fictional organization known as the Talamaska that is responsible for investigating the supernatural.

    February 2008

  • Swipe-the-card-type machines are the MOST likely in involve cloning;

    Another bank story

  • Hitting categories that correlate with the best records again involve reaching base.

    USATODAY.com - On-base percentage the key to success

  • Now Professor Huxley would have readily admitted that the truth of a proposition may be denied whenever its terms involve a contradiction.

    Theism or Atheism The Great Alternative

  • Investors are cautioned that all forward-looking statements in this call involve risks and uncertainty and that future events may differ from the statements made.

    Altera CEO Discusses Q4 2010 Earnings Call Transcript - Seeking Alpha

  • Nor did Mrs. Mittin involve her in much distress how her own trouble might be recompensed; the cap she found unfit for Camilla, she could contrive, she said, to alter for herself; and as a friend had given her a ticket for the ball, it would be mighty convenient to her, as she had nothing of the kind ready.

    Camilla: or, A Picture of Youth

  • O, Sir, shall I ever again involve myself in so foolish an embarrassment?

    Evelina: or, The History of a Young Lady's Entrance Into the World

  • All phone calls involve latency, which means there's a delay between when you speak and when the other person hears it.

    Latest from Computerworld

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