Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Intricate; complex.
  • adjective Botany Having the margins rolled inward.
  • adjective Zoology Having whorls that enclose and obscure earlier whorls. Used of a gastropod shell.
  • intransitive verb To curl inward.
  • noun The curve traced by a point as if it were on a taut string being unwound from another curve.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To return to a normal condition.
  • Noting a form of tooth-profile, used in gearing, traced by a point at the end of a tangent as it is unwrapped from a base-circle.
  • Rolled up; wrapped up.
  • Involved; confusedly mingled.
  • noun That which is involved.
  • noun In geometry, the curve traced by any point of a flexible and inextensible string when the latter is unwrapped, under tension, from a given curve; or, in other words, the locus of a point in a right line which rolls, without sliding, over a given curve.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective (Bot.) Rolled inward from the edges; -- said of leaves in vernation, or of the petals of flowers in æstivation.
  • adjective Turned inward at the margin, as the exterior lip of the Cyprea.
  • adjective Rolled inward spirally.
  • noun (Geom.) A curve traced by the end of a string wound upon another curve, or unwound from it; -- called also evolvent. See evolute.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective formal Difficult to understand; complicated.
  • adjective botany Having the edges rolled with the adaxial side outward.
  • adjective biology, of shells Having a complex pattern of coils.
  • adjective biology Turned inward at the margin, like the exterior lip of the Cyprea.
  • adjective biology Rolled inward spirally.
  • verb To roll or curl inwards.
  • noun geometry A curve that cuts all tangents of another curve at right angles; traced by a point on a string that unwinds from a curved object.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective (of some shells) closely coiled so that the axis is obscured
  • adjective especially of petals or leaves in bud; having margins rolled inward

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin involūtus, past participle of involvere, to enwrap; see involve.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin involutus.

Examples

  • Without thinking, outréblack squirrels inhabit upper Michigan and petrify the involute world.

    Black Squirrel Poem

  • Oh, and a nuanced take on bringing involute cunning to a ruthlessness contest.

    Making Light: Rowling's being sued for plagiarism again

  • You offer a variety points of view, acknowledge your own contradictions, resolve them, involute and qualify and complicate and undermine those resolutions, and end up with an ultimate determination so considered, nuanced, and precise, with so much allowance for exceptions, that the only possible response short of writing a parallel novella-length essay of my own (like I did last time) is to quibble.

    The Sacred Domain

  • But the common law was involute, overformalized, and fiction-ridden not because it was changeless, but precisely because it was constantly changing.

    A History of American Law

  • But the common law was involute, overformalized, and fiction-ridden not because it was changeless, but precisely because it was constantly changing.

    A History of American Law

  • But the common law was involute, overformalized, and fiction-ridden not because it was changeless, but precisely because it was constantly changing.

    A History of American Law

  • The possible moves being not only manifold but involute, the chances of such oversights are multiplied; and in nine cases out of ten it is the more concentrative rather than the more acute player who conquers.

    The Murders in the Rue Morgue

  • “But why should they?” persisted Cowperwood, charmed and interested by the involute character of her logic.

    The Titan

  • There are compromises of the spirit too elusive and subtle to be traced in all their involute windings.

    The Titan

  • The term "free threshing" is also applied to the involute glumes of some West African guinea sorghums.

    10. Sorghum: Specialty Types

Comments

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  • shrink

    November 18, 2010

  • The thymus involutes with age and is virtually undetectable

    in postpubertal humans

    November 18, 2010