Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly Southern U.S. See okra. See Regional Note at goober.
  • n. A soup or stew thickened with okra pods. Also called okra.
  • n. Chiefly Mississippi Valley & Western U.S. A fine silty soil, common in the southern and western United States, that forms an unusually sticky mud when wet.
  • n. A French patois spoken by some Black people and Creoles in Louisiana and the French West Indies.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The okra plant or its pods.
  • n. A soup or stew made with okra.
  • n. A fine silty soil that when wet becomes very thick and heavy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A soup thickened with the mucilaginous pods of the okra; okra soup.
  • n. The okra plant or its pods.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The pod of Hibiscus esculentus, also called okra.
  • n. A soup, usually of chicken, thickened with okra.
  • n. A dish made of young capsules of okra, seasoned with salt and pepper, and stewed and served with melted butter.
  • n. A patois spoken by West Indian and Louisianian creoles and negroes.
  • n. A type of soil in the southern and western United States which forms a tough, dark-colored mass in a high degree plastic and clay-like, yet sometimes consisting chiefly of silt or very fine sand. It is very sticky and difficult to till when wet, and when dry breaks into hard cuboidal lumps. See gumbo clay.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any of various fine-grained silty soils that become waxy and very sticky mud when saturated with water
  • n. long mucilaginous green pods; may be simmered or sauteed but used especially in soups and stews
  • n. a soup or stew thickened with okra pods
  • n. tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Louisiana French gombo, of Bantu origin; akin to Tshiluba ki-ngumbo, okra.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Bantu ngombo, kingombo ("okra plant"). Cognate to Portuguese quiabo, Caribbean Spanish guingambó, and cognates in other Romance languages.

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Chewy suitor?

    March 28, 2010

  • Title of a Dr John album.

    February 15, 2009

  • "Mma Ramotswe had more or less forgotten that Mma Makutsi spoke Ikalanga until one day she had used an Ikalanga word in the middle of a sentence, and it had stuck out.

    'I have hurt my gumbo,' Mma Makutsi had said.

    Mma Ramotswe had looked at her in surprise. 'Your gumbo?'

    'Yes,' said Mma Makutsi. 'When I was walking to work today, I stepped into a pothole and hurt my gumbo.' She paused, noticing the look of puzzlement on Mma Ramotswe's face. Then she realised. 'I'm sorry,' she said. 'Gumbo is foot in Ikalanga.'"

    - 'The Full Cupboard of Life', Alexander McCall Smith.

    March 18, 2008

  • Other than basenji...not many.

    January 10, 2008

  • Pure etymological ecstasy. How many English words come from Bantu?

    January 10, 2008