Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A rich, creamy soup made from meat, fish, or shellfish.
  • noun A thick cream soup made of puréed vegetables.
  • noun Ice cream mixed with crushed macaroons or nuts.
  • noun An advantage allowed an inferior player in certain games, such as a free point in tennis, an extra turn in croquet, or an additional stroke in golf.
  • noun A pale orange-yellow to yellowish gray.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See bisk.
  • noun In ceramics: Formerly, same as biscuit, 3.
  • noun A variety of unglazed white porcelain used for statuettes and other small figures.
  • noun See bisk.
  • noun In cookery, a soup made of meat or fish slowly stewed until all the strength is extracted, and thickened with finely minced or shredded forcemeat; specifically, such a soup made from crabs, crawfish, shrimps, and the like. Also spelled bisk.
  • noun An ice-cream with which powdered macaroons are mixed before freezing. Called also biscuit Tortoni.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Unglazed white porcelain.
  • noun A white soup made of crayfish.
  • noun A point taken by the receiver of odds in the game of tennis; also, an extra innings allowed to a weaker player in croquet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A thick creamy soup made from fish, shellfish, meat or vegetables.
  • noun sports An extra turn, free point or some other advantage allowed.
  • noun A pale pinkish brown colour.
  • adjective of a pale pinkish brown colour

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a thick cream soup made from shellfish

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Perhaps from French dialectal, sour soup, from Biscaye, Bay of Biscay.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From biscuit.]

Examples

  • This recipe is a modification of the pumpkin bisque recipe from the Professional Chef, with a bit of advice from Irene.

    Butternut Squash Soup with Fried Sage Leaves

  • There were 12 soups on the menu Tuesday, including the company's most popular lobster bisque, which is also the most expensive with a large portion selling for $20.

    Edmonton Sun

  • Dirty pigs and sanded cereals can principally call your bisque and toilet seat and elongated un welcoming.

    Wii-volution

  • There were 12 soups on the menu Tuesday, including the company's most popular lobster bisque, which is also the most expensive with a large portion selling for $20.

    JAM! Showbiz

  • The bisque is a recipe for "Belzoni Crawfish Rice and Corn" and is found on pages 84 and 85.

    Blogger News Network

  • The bisque, which is a special addition to the menu one evening, has a rich lobster flavor.

    Home/News

  • The material is now made into "bisque," or biscuit, by a preliminary baking in small ovens, when it is ready for painting, if it is to be painted on the biscuit; if not, it is ready for the glazing.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 303, October 22, 1881

  • Log in to Reply thatonejimguy (UID#3565) on November 12th, 2009 at 12: 23 am it looks more like a bisque to me. or perhaps a reduction sauce.

    storm trooper soup | My[confined]Space

  • Dirk's Fish and Gourmet offered a light oyster bisque with a generous amount of fresh oysters, the recipe for which they were notably giving away.

    Caroline O'Donovan: At the Chowdah Fest

  • Dirk's Fish and Gourmet offered a light oyster bisque with a generous amount of fresh oysters, the recipe for which they were notably giving away.

    Caroline O'Donovan: At the Chowdah Fest

Comments

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  • the decisive dish in a battle between Iron Chef French and the Californian challenger. much to everyone's surprise, the latter's bisque was superior. the shock the judging panel showed at this turn of events was intriguing, seeming to encode an initial assumption that the exquisiteness of such a dish was beyond the crude sensibility of an American. all parties showed face and dignity at this awkward cultural junction, the judges smiling through their disbelief, the victor managing despite clenched teeth to give the final interview, and the vanquished maintaing good-natured silence.

    in short, the Bisque Battle remains one for the vaults for the cultural analyst.

    October 30, 2009

  • Liquid food often containing pieces of solid food ... can't be too difficult, surely.

    October 30, 2009

  • Your brain is solid stuff floating in a liquid. You want to make one? ;)

    October 30, 2009

  • Good to have you back, jenn!

    October 30, 2009

  • (noun) - (1) A fault at tennis.

    --Elisha Coles' English Dictionary, 1713

    (2) A stroke handicap allowed to a weaker player.

    --Nathaniel Bailey's Etymological English Dictionary, 1749

    January 14, 2018