Gammerstang has adopted no words, looked up 9132 words, created 18 lists, listed 7935 words, written 1717 comments, added 7 tags, and loved 95 words.

Comments by Gammerstang

  • resembling a teardrop

    November 3, 2018

  • Looked it up in Google books. Misspelling of prostate?

    November 3, 2018

  • Winding (as if around a pole) in shape.

    November 3, 2018

  • shaped like a stake

    November 3, 2018

  • Penitentes, or nieves penitentes (Spanish for "penitent-shaped snows"), are snow formations found at high altitudes. They take the form of elongated, thin blades of hardened snow or ice, closely spaced and pointing towards the general direction of the sun.

    November 2, 2018

  • An Earth analog (also referred to as an Earth twin or Earth-like planet, though this latter term may refer to any terrestrial planet) is a planet or moon with environmental conditions similar to those found on Earth.

    November 2, 2018

  • An acarinarium is a specialized anatomical structure which is evolved to facilitate the retention of mites on the body of an organism, typically a bee or a wasp.

    October 27, 2018

  • of the nature of wayfaring; pert. to travel ...1629 obs. rare

    October 4, 2018

  • a thing of very little value ...1965 Amer. dial.

    October 4, 2018

  • turn to stone

    October 4, 2018

  • Reminds me of a famous line from the book 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    August 16, 2018

  • (Spanish) black vulture, buzzard

    August 11, 2018

  • (Italian) a thick mass of hair

    August 11, 2018

  • Old Turkish coin

    August 11, 2018

  • Malayan for the agile gibbon

    August 11, 2018

  • Anything notable, amazing etc; also as adj.

    August 11, 2018

  • (particle physics) A theoretical superheavy dark matter particle, trillions of times more massive than other proposed types of dark matter.

    August 11, 2018

  • (whet'i-what'i), n, [A re- duplii-aWd form, based on wheet-wheet, an imitation of the piping note uttered by birds when fondling each other.

    August 11, 2018

  • A thumping blow: spec, a backhanded blow.

    August 11, 2018

  • Shameful speech

    August 11, 2018

  • (Maori) (verb) to loosen, loose, at ease.

    August 11, 2018

  • verb (used with object) to split, cut up, and broil or fry (an eel). to treat severely.

    August 11, 2018

  • Snuttering, vbl. n. Cf. 17th c. Eng. snatter (1647), Chattering. — Urquhart Rabelais iii xiii 107.

    The snarling of messens, rantling of rats, … snuttering of monkies;

    August 11, 2018

  • In marbles, a close miss.

    August 11, 2018

  • The smallest portion of anything. The English Dialect Dictionary: R-S

    edited by Joseph Wright

    August 11, 2018

  • A cat shark of the family Scyliorhinidae.

    August 11, 2018

  • The ushabti (also called shabti or shawabti, with a number of variant spellings) was a funerary figurine used in ancient Egyptian religion.

    August 11, 2018

  • An ancient dental tool.

    August 11, 2018

  • (French) verb 1. pick one's food

    August 11, 2018

  • Rare. the raising and training of pigeons.

    August 11, 2018

  • informal speech style of Javanese.

    August 11, 2018

  • The study of beer bottle labels. — meadophile, n.

    August 11, 2018

  • (Greek) a winnowing fan or basket, used in The Dionysian Mysteries.

    August 11, 2018

  • A slit between the folding parts of a screen.

    August 11, 2018

  • A deific hunchback from Hopi culture, better known as Kokopelli.

    August 11, 2018

  • Creatures from the mythology of Solomon Islands.

    August 11, 2018

  • a coarse cotton cloth formerly imported from India.

    August 11, 2018

  • Old spelling of fornix.

    August 11, 2018

  • A stupid, dull, loutish clod.

    August 11, 2018

  • (Spanish) nearly monobrowed; having eyebrows nearly together

    August 11, 2018

  • a swift; a small plain-colored bird of the family Apodidae that resembles a swallow and is noted for its rapid flight

    August 11, 2018

  • To swing about; to hang

    August 11, 2018

  • A banghy was a bamboo pole with slings on each side to support heavy dispatches, parcels or baggage. It was carried by a parcel bearer, (known as a banghywallah).

    August 11, 2018

  • Ascolia, in Ancient Greece, was a yearly feast that the peasants of Attica celebrated in honor of Dionysus. The rites included sacrificing a goat, chosen because goats were prone to eating and destroying grapevines, and using its skin to make a football, which was filled with wine and smeared in oil. Festival participants then competed against each other by trying to leap onto it in a game that gave the festival its name (askoliazein or ασκωλιάζειν); the one who remained standing at the end of the contest won the wineskin as a prize. Participants also painted their faces with wine dregs, sang hymns, and recited satirical poetry.

    August 11, 2018

  • n : Servant employed to remove unwanted armpit hair. Who knows if it's a real word or one Balderdash made up.

    August 11, 2018

  • 1. An unsatisfied desire. 2. An anxious suspense.

    Hygogical a. Unattainable; next to impossible.

    Burgess Unabridged: A New Dictionary of Words You Have Always Needed

    By Gelett Burgess, 1914

    August 11, 2018

  • Said of the flesh risen or discolored in stripes or "reeangs" as from the stroke of a whip.

    August 9, 2018

  • Wish I had written down the definition as found in Balderdash (which probably wasn't accurate anyway) but it's also referenced in a book called Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin in a list of weird words. Shame. Interestingly enough, I keep getting synonyms for "sharp" in Google's suggestions.

    August 9, 2018

  • vb (tr)

    another word for spiflicate

    August 9, 2018

  • An anti-proverb or a perverb is the transformation of a standard proverb for humorous effect. Paremiologist Wolfgang Mieder defines them as "parodied, twisted, or fractured proverbs that reveal humorous or satirical speech play with traditional proverbial wisdom".

    August 9, 2018

  • A comprador or compradore is a "person who acts as an agent for foreign organizations engaged in investment, trade, or economic or political exploitation"

    August 9, 2018

  • The obsolete word bronstrops "procuress," frequently found in Middleton's comedies, probably is an alteration of baude-strote.

    August 9, 2018

  • intransitive verb. 1 : to work with or as if with the nose; especially : to root, rub, or snuff something. 2 : to lie close or snug.

    August 9, 2018

  • Dronkship. of cobblers: cobblers collectively—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.

    August 9, 2018

  • Having hairy buttocks. From Ancient Greek δασύς (dasús, “hairy, dense”) + πυγή (pugḗ, “buttocks”).

    August 9, 2018

  • a) a prospector in the desert

    b) the noise made by an object in collision

    c) a great rage

    d) an old term for a hare

    August 1, 2018

  • A scutoid is a geometric solid between two parallel surfaces. The boundary of each of the surfaces (and of all the other parallel surfaces between them) is a polygon, and the vertices of the two end polygons are joined by either by a curve or a Y-shaped connection. Scutoids present at least one vertex between these two planes. The faces of the scutoids are not necessarily convex, so several scutoids can pack together to fill all the space between the two parallel surfaces.The object was first described in Nature Communications in July 2018, and the name scutoid was coined because of its resemblance to the shape of the scutellum in some insects, such as beetles in the Cetoniidae subfamily.

    August 1, 2018

  • in a proprietorial capacity or manner.

    July 30, 2018

  • Dutch: “pragmatic cooperation despite differences”

    July 30, 2018

  • A prosimetrum (plural prosimetra) is a poetic composition which exploits a combination of prose (prosa) and verse (metrum), in particular, it is a text composed in alternating segments of prose and verse. It is widely found in Western and Eastern literature.

    July 30, 2018

  • A swordstaff (Svärdstav) is a Scandinavian polearm, used in the medieval ages. It is made by placing a blade at the end of a staff.

    July 21, 2018

  • Viking throwing string attached to a spear and serving the same function as an atlatl. http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/manufacturing/text/viking_spear.htm#string

    July 21, 2018

  • A vorlage (ˈfoːɐ̯laːɡə; from the German for prototype or template) is a prior version or manifestation of a text under consideration. It may refer to such a version of a text itself, a particular manuscript of the text, or a more complex manifestation of the text (e.g., a group of copies, or a group of excerpts). Thus, the original-language version of a text which a translator then works into a translation is called the vorlage of that translation. For example, the Luther Bible is a translation of the Textus Receptus. So in this case the Textus Receptus is the vorlage of the Luther Bible.

    July 19, 2018

  • Apographa refers to established copies or transcripts of certain texts, usually religious or ecclesiastical, rather than the original autographs by the original authors or writers.

    July 19, 2018

  • This was the name of Mad Max's kid? Not very imaginative...

    July 14, 2018

  • Australian slang: a flashily dressed young man of brash and vulgar behaviour, to dress up in flashy clothes, to renovate or dress up something in bad taste

    July 12, 2018

  • Latin for "one world", is the concept of an underlying unified reality from which everything emerges and to which everything returns.

    July 12, 2018

  • A sinkhole, also known as a cenote, sink, sink-hole, swallet, swallow hole, or doline (the different terms for sinkholes are often used interchangeably), is a depression or hole in the ground caused by some form of collapse of the surface layer.

    July 11, 2018

  • is a pigmentation abnormality characterized by the lack of pigments called melanins, commonly associated with a genetic loss of tyrosinase function. Amelanism can affect fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans.

    July 7, 2018

  • "The wrong type of snow" or "the wrong kind of snow" is a phrase coined by the British media in 1991 after severe weather caused disruption to many of British Rail's services. A British Rail press release implied that management and its engineering staff were unaware of different types of snow. Henceforth in the United Kingdom, the phrase became a byword for euphemistic and pointless excuses.1

    July 6, 2018

  • a verse usually consisting of the first lines of a Latin version of the 51st psalm formerly set before an accused person claiming benefit of clergy so that the person might vindicate his claim by an intelligent reading aloud of the verse before examiners.

    July 6, 2018

  • (also magnetic hematite, hemalyke or hemalike) is an artificial magnetic material. Hematine is widely used in jewelry.

    July 6, 2018

  • Lichtenberg figures appearing on people are sometimes called lightning flowers, and they are thought to be caused by the rupture of capillaries under the skin due to the passage of the lightning current or the shock wave from the lightning discharge as it flashes over the skin

    July 6, 2018

  • the lee side of a dune where the slope approximates the angle of rest of loose sand that is generally about 33 degrees.

    July 6, 2018

  • “Salitter seems only to have occurred, used in this way, in the writings of Jakob Boehme, a 17th century German Christian mystic. Here is enough of what he says about it, to begin to understand the exquisite choice made by McCarthy in using the word: ‘What is in Paradise is made of the celestial Salitter… it is clear, resplendent … The forces of the celestial Salitter give rise to celestial fruits flowers, and vegetation.’ Salitter, as used by Boehme, as used by McCarthy, is the essence of God.”

    July 6, 2018

  • the interpretation of written, oral, or artistic expression as allegory.

    July 1, 2018

  • In a leaf with reticulate venation, an area surrounded by veins. in A Dictionary of Plant Sciences

    June 28, 2018

  • Tafl games are a family of ancient Germanic and Celtic strategy board games played on a checkered or latticed gameboard with two armies of uneven numbers, representing variants of an early Scandinavian board game called tafl or hnefatafl in contemporary literature.

    June 27, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A favorite liquor among the common people, composed of ale and roasted apples. The pulp of the roasted apple was worked up with the ale till the mixture formed a smooth beverage. Fanciful etymologies for this popular word have been thought of, but it was probably named from its smoothness, resembling the wool of lambs. --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859 (2) The pulpe of the roasted apples, in number foure or five, according to the greatnesse of the apples, mixed in a quart of faire water, laboured together untill it come to be as apples and ale, which we call lambes-wooll. --Thomas Johnson's Gerard's Herball, 1633 (3) A corruption of la mas ubhal, that is, the day of the apple fruit. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A party who meet to frolic in the open air. --John Ogilvie's Comprehensive English Dictionary, 1865

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To chew thoroughly. --Mitford Mathews' Dictionary of Americanisms, 1956

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A small fortune, said of a girl's marriage-portion. --William Cope's Glossary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A portion of a dish left by the guests, that the host may not feel himself reproached for insufficient preparation. --Joseph Hunter's Hallamshire Glossary, 1829 (2) A morsel left in a dish to avoid the imputation of greediness. --T. Ellwood Zell's Popular Encyclopedia, 1871

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A ridge of land left unploughed. --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755 (2) As used in Scotland, a strip two or three feet in breadth. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Divested of the character of murder; pronounced to be not murder. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Where a man, for being shaved and paying three-pence, may stand a chance of getting ten pound. --The London Annual Register, 1777

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Passing through the air in balloons. --Noah Webster's Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, 1806

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A slang name for a cemetery. --Ramon Adams' Western Words: A Dictionary of the Range, Cow Camps, and Trail, 1946

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - A little drunk or intoxicated. --Walter Skeat's North of England Words, 1873

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A donkey or ass, evidently allusive to our Savior's entrance into Jerusalem on an ass. --G.F. Northall's Warwickshire Word-Book, 1896

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The "closet of decency," or "house of office." Very likely from "four acres," the original "necessary" having been, in all likelihood, a field behind the school. --John Camden Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who prepares materials for embalming the dead; from Latin pollinctus, French polingère, to wash and prepare a corpse for a funeral. --William Whitney's Century Dictionary, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Bastard offspring. Cymbeline. --C.H. Herford's Notes on the Works of Shakespeare, 1902

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Glittering with gold. The word was properly used of thin sheets of gold, and hence already suggests the golden sheen made more definite by the words: "Today the French, all cliquant, all in gold, like heathen gods, shone down the English." Henry VIII. --C.H. Herford's Glossary of the Works of Shakespeare, 1902

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - When three persons go into a public-house, call for liquor generally considered sufficient for two, and have a glass which will divide it into three equal portions, they are said to "drink three outs." --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The indisposition of a drunkard after a debauch. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Chicken broth with eggs dropped in it, or eggs beaten and mixed in it. --William Whitney's Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A writer of a monograph, a paper or treatise written on one particular subject. --Daniel Lyons' The American Dictionary of the English Language, 1897

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The keeper of the sacred chickens observed for purposes of augury; adopted from Old French pouletier, poultry-keeper. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1909

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A gift of something useless to the giver. Sometimes called a "North-country compliment." --John Camden Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (adverb) - The medieval English croppe and the Anglo-Saxon cropp both meant the top of a plant; the Old French croup meant the top of a hill. Thus, crop has come to mean the top of anything, including the ears of corn at the top of the stalk and the head of a man. The Norwegian nakk meant a knoll, or top of a hill. Thus neck and crop is simply a strengthening of the idea. To fall neck and crop is to crash completely. --Edwin Radford's Encyclopaedia of Phrases and Origins, 1945

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Thrown or cast. --Richard Verstegan's A Restitution of Decayed Intelligence, 1605

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A girl who operates a telephone switchboard. --William Craigie's Dictionary of American English, 1940 (2) The use of the word "hello" is rigorously barred to the "hello girl." --Booklover's Magazine, October 1903 (3) We had visitors anxious to listen to the sweet voice of the "hello girl." --Boston Transcript, February 1908

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A darling; a "dear little pig's eye." Commonly used as an endearing form of address to a girl. Charles Dickens called his wife "dearest mouse" and "dearest darling pig." --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Supplied or provided with vowels, especially to an unusual extent. Also with qualifying terms, as well-vowelled. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Elated; in high spirits. --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Dashed about by the waves. --William Perry's Royal Standard English Dictionary, 1809

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - The knees. --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Coarse hempen cloth; Eastern England. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855 (2) Hempen cloth of very coarse texture. Perhaps so named because only fit to be used as bags or wrappers for rolls or bales of finer goods. --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Bewildered, surprised, disappointed. --Michael Traynor's The English Dialect of Donegal, 1953

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To commit a petty theft; to pilfer. --Major B. Lowsley's Glossary of Berkshire Words and Phrases, 1888

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Always used for dead. --J.D. Robertson's Glossary of Archaic Gloucestershire Words, 1890

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - (1) Food provisions, victuals, eatables; adaptation of Old French vivres, plural of vivre, food, sustenance. Only Scottish until the nineteenth century. Its later currency is probably due to its frequent occurrence in Waverly novels. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928 (2) From Latin vivo, to live. --Edward Lloyd's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To play the actor. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (slang phrase) - Going well. A reference to the brilliant military successes of Sir Garnet Wolseley during the Egyptian campaign of the '80s. "How's the war? All Sir Garnet." --Edwin Radford's Encyclopaedia of Phrases and Origins, 1945

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A pie made of herring-like pilchards and leeks, the heads of the pilchards appearing throughout the crust as if they were studying the sky. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun/verb) - A breakdown. To commit a blunder. --Rev. Alfred Easther's Glossary of Almondbury and Huddersfield, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To expell; to be furked, to be expelled; Winchester School Glossary. --William Cope's Glossary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Among miners, a bargain "by the lump." --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A disease, often epidemic among children; the whooping-cough. From Dutch kind, a child, and kuch, cough. --John Ogilvie's Comprehensive English Dictionary, 1865

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - An abundance of, or being full of fleas. --Daniel Fenning's Royal English Dictionary, 1775

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A pocket handkerchief. --Walter Skeat's Glossary of English Dialects in Poetry, 1896

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Muggy, sultry; spoken of the weather. --William Marshall's Agricultural Provincialisms of the Midland Station, 1790

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A murderer, a killer of men; from man, and Saxon cwellan, to kill. More anciently it meant an executioner. Dame Quickly in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV adds woman-queller, which shows that she understood the first word: "Thou art a honyseed, a man-queller, and a woman-queller." --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    April 23, 2018

  • (slang) - To make buckle and tongue meet, to make ends meet. "Beginning without money, he had as much as he could do to make buckle and tongue meet," as the phrase goes. Harper's Magazine, April 1888. --William Cragie's Dictionary of American English, 1940

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Diseased in the ropes, or entrails. --T. Lewis Davies' Supplimental English Glossary, 1881

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) Gadding abroad idly to hear or carry news. Possibly from eve-droppings, and may denote the conduct of eve-droppers, who harken for news under windows; expressive of the talebearer's chief employment, to carry stories from house to house. --Frederick Elworthy's Specimens of English Dialects, 1778 (2) Usually applied to women, but not always; not used in any other sense. "Her is always steehopping about; better fit her would abide at home and mind her own house, same as I be forced to." --Frederick Elworthy's The West Somerset Word Book, 1888

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - An undertaker's business. --Granville Leveson-Gower's A Glossary of Surrey Words, 1893

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Unstable; changeable. --W.E.T. Morgan's Radnorshire Words, 1881

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A peculiar sort of bread made for feeding horses. --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859 (2) Take two bushels of good clean beans and one bushel of wheat, and grind them together. Then, through a fine sieve bolt out the quantity of two pecks of pure meal and bake it in two or three loaves by itself. The rest sift through a meal sieve and knead it with water and good store of barme yeast. And so, bake it in great loaves, and with the coarser bread feed your horse in his rest. --Gervase Markham's Country Contentments, 1615

    April 23, 2018

  • (interjection) - A term of encouragement to dogs, generally to incite them to fight. "Uts! Uts to 'n!" --R. Pearse Chope's The Dialect of Hartland, Devonshire, 1891

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A generous, big-hearted, good-natured person, with also an implied sense of gaity or flippancy. --Michael Traynor's The English Dialect of Donegal, 1953

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Highland whisky, distilled over peat fires. --Alexander Warrack's Scots Dialect Dictionary, 1911

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One of the simplest devices of the word-juggler, and as old as the Romans. It consists in selecting certain letters indicating a date from a name or an inscription on a tomb, an arch, or a medal, printing them larger than the others, and obtaining thereby a date which is regarded as an augury. In some chronograms only the initial letters are counted as forming the solutions to the puzzle, but in others all the characters used for Roman numerals are taken into account. History supplies many first-rate chronograms. In fact it was once the custom to strike medals with chronogramic sentences in which the date of the occasion commemorated was set forth by the letters selected. --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - As the meaning of the expression, "to sleeve a two," appears plainly to be to twist or fold silk thread so subtle that it is difficult to untwist it, sleeveless then should seem to mean "that which cannot be unfolded or explained." --John Brand's Observations on Popular Antiquities, 1813

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who attempts to explain different physiological or pathological phenomenon by means of animalcules microbes. --Robley Dunglison's Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The custom of "shouldering," which was for the coachman to take the fare of a way-passenger--one who did not register or start at the booking-office--and pocket it without making any return to the coach agent or proprietor, was universal in England. Some coach companies suffered much by it, and it was a tidy bit of profit to the unscrupulous coachman. Shouldering was common also in the New World. --Alice Morse Earle's Stagecoach and Tavern Days, 1900

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Fermented urine, formerly used for laundry purposes, being a strong detergent. --Francis Taylor's Folk-Speech of South Lancashire, 1901 (2) Formerly preserved in tubs for washing, to soften the water and save soap. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Conceit, show of importance. A consequential person is said to have eighteen pence around him. Originally the word would apply to people who made arrogant assumption stand in the place of wealth and position. --Thomas Darlington's The Folk-Speech of South Cheshire, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Faint; indisposed; exhausted. --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The study period in school. A teacher told me that she whipped a boy "for hollerin' in time o' books." Ozarks. --Vance Randolph and George Wilson's Down in the Holler, 1953

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - In 1797 a tax upon clocks of five shillings a year, and seven shillings sixpence on watches, was imposed by Act of Parliament. It was short-lived, being repealed in 1798 after demand for timepieces had been reduced by more than half. --Edwin Radford's Encyclopaedia of Phrases and Origins, 1945

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To make obeisance; to bow. This verb has perhaps been formed as primarily denoting the obeisance made by servants when they expect a vale, a gratuity from visitors. Samuel Johnson derives this from avail, profit, or Latin vale, farewell. Perhaps from French veiller, to watch, studiously attend. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - The phrase was once used all through the United States as a synonym for "first-rate." The word chop is Chinese for "quality." --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who uses or drives an automobile; from 1897. Automobilize, to habituate to the use of an automobile. --William Craigie's Dictionary of American English, 1940

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - In a proper manner. This curious slang expression originated in the West among New Englanders emigrated from the East. With them, naturally, all that is done in their native land is right, and hence, what they admire they simply call about East. --Sylva Clapin's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1902

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To pruttock about, to play about, enjoy freedom, show off fine clothes and the like. Used of servant girls on holiday. --Edward Gepp's Essex Dialect Dictionary, 1923

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A name used in court, to distinguish one plot of ground from another: black acre, white acre, green acre, etc.. After a time, to black-acre meant to litigate over land. --Joseph Shipley's Dictionary of Early English, 1955

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Rolling shot cannon balls about on the lower deck, and other discordant noises, when seamen are discontented, but without being mutinous. --Admiral William Smyth's Sailor's Word Book, 1867

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A miserably small pittance of anything, as if it were no more than the cat can take up by one stroke of her tongue. --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - During the 1939-45 war, many thousands of old envelopes were renovated for re-use by government departments. Several prisons made contributions in this work, and the "envelope party" generally comprised the very old and the infirm men. At Wormwood Scrubs, after the war, a party of elderly and crippled men was still employed on this work. At "tally time," they were first off the mark with the prison officers' cry of "Lead on, Envelopes!" --Paul Tempest's Lag's Lexicon: A Dictionary of the English Prison, 1950

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Purification by destruction of evil impulses. --William Craigie's Dictionary of American English, 1940

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Rudeness of manners, barbarousness. Gothicize, to bring back to gothicism. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) To struggle like a drowning person; to splash or flounder about; late seventeenth to twentieth centuries. --Mairi Robinson's Concise Scots Dictionary, 1985 (2) To work in confusion, or in a confused manner. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A wet-nurse. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Having hair growing between the eyebrows. Here it is deemed unlucky to meet a person thus marked, especially if the first one meets in the morning. Elsewhere it is a favourable omen. The term, I suppose, had been primarily applied to a woman as by this exuberance indicating something of a masculine character. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) It is a custom in the North, when a man tells the greatest lie in the company, to reward him with a whetstone, which is called lying for the whetstone. --Joseph Budworth's Fortnight's Rambles to the Lakes, 1792 (2) The term whetstone, for a liar, or for the prize for lying, was a standing jest among our ancestors. --Frederick Elworthy's Specimens of English Dialects, 1778 (3) Lying with us is so loved and allowed that there are many tymes gamings and prizes to encourage one to outlye another. And what shall he gaine that gets the victorie in lying? He shall have a silver whetstone for his labour. --Thomas Lupton's Too Good to Be True, 1580

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Holiday dress, fine clothes; Lancashire. --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To accumulate grievances against an enemy. --Appleton Morgan's Study in the Warwickshire Dialect, 1900

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - Flaunting with vulgar ostentation; intensive of flare. --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A ballet. Theaters where stage dancing forms a prominent feature of the entertainment are similarly called leg-shops. --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Poverty, barrenness, particularly want of interesting matter; a deficiency of matter that can engage the attention and gratify the mind, as the jejuneness of style or narrative. Jejunity is not used. --Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 (2) Jejunitie, barrennesse or slendernesse of stile. --Henry Cockeram's Interpreter of Hard English Words, 1623

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Our Saxon ancestors were accustomed to use peg-tankards, or tankards with a peg inserted at eight equal intervals, that when two or more drank from the same bowl no one might exceed his fair portion. We are told that St. Dunstan introduced the fashion to prevent brawling. "I am a peg too low" means I want another draught to cheer me up. --Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The tendon of the neck of cattle or sheep. Figuratively, and perhaps ludicrously, transferred to the punishment of the juggs, or pillory. --John Jamieson's Scottish Etymological Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Formerly all English dinners commenced with pudding, as they still do in remote districts. Hence, pudding-time meant dinner time. A foreigner who in the seventeenth century visited England and published his experiences in 1698 speaks enthusiastically of English puddings: "Oh what an excellent thing is an English pudding! To come at pudding-time is a proverbial phrase meaning to come at the happiest moment in the world. Make a pudding for an Englishman and you will regale him." --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A smuggler. Sussex. --Edward Nairne's Kentish Tales with Historical Notes, 1790

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) The use of ambiguous expressions. --Edward Lloyd's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895 (2) The use of indeterminate expressions; discourse of doubtful meaning. --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755 (3) Double-speaking. --Nathaniel Bailey's Etymological English Dictionary, 1749

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A ring made of the hinge of a coffin is supposed to have the virtue of preventing the cramp. --Francis Grose's Provincial Glossary, 1787 (2) Formerly, rings made from the hinges of coffins were worn as charms for the cure of fits, or for the prevention of cramp or even rheumatism. The superstition continues, though the metal is of necessity changed, few coffins having now hinges of silver. --John Harland and T.T. Wilkinson's Lancashire Folklore, 1867 (3) When a grave was reopened, people stripped a piece of metal from an old coffin. It was cut in circular shape, a hole was bored in it, and the amulet was worn suspended from a ribbon round the neck. --Marie Trevelyan's Folklore of Wales, 1909

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Sheep's-eyed; sidelong; shy; used also when a person squints a little. Perhaps the word is cannywest, for canny hinny, in some parts, means a sly person. --Rev. Alfred Easther's Glossary of Almondbury and Huddersfield, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A medicine which when applied to the mucous membrane of the nose increases the natural secretions and produces sneezing. Having the action of an errhine. --Sydenham Society's Lexicon of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 1897

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - The knocker-up carries a long pole with which he taps at the bedroom windows of his clients. --Thomas Darlington's Folk-Speech of Cheshire, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The phrase, "the hammer of it," means the long and short of it. "That's about the hammer of it," concludes an argument or explanation. --Edward Gepp's Essex Dialect Dictionary, 1923

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - People without the ties of business. --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Justice of the Peace. --A.V. Judges' The Elizabethan Underworld Glossary, 1930

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A cavity in a rock; a cave, a hollow; adaptation of Cornish mining term vooga; hence, vuggy, full of cavities. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928 (2) Vughy rock, a stratum of cellular structure, or one containing many cavities. --William Gresley's Glossary of Terms Used in Coal Mining, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Those who signed the Declaration of Independence. --Richard Thornton's American Glossary, 1912

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The maid who attends the kimmer, or matron who has the charge of the infant at kimmerings, or baptisms; who lifts the babe into the arms of its father to receive the sprinkling of salvation. --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    April 23, 2018

  • pregnance, fertility, inventive power. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who pledges a ship, or other property, as security for the repayment of money borrowed. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A blue pig is a place where whiskey is surreptitiously sold. --Gilbert Tucker's American English, 1921

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) To be a busybody or eavesdropper. --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905 (2) To collect and retail scandal. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A vacillation or wavering in decision; formed on Latin volo, I am willing, and nolo, I am unwilling. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1929

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The bed kept in farmers' barns for beggars. --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - An eyeglass. This was applied to the old single eyeglass, which was not stuck in the eye, as now, but was held in the hand. --John Camden Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • s:

    Fipple (noun) - (1) The underlip. "See how he hangs his fipple." --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825 (2) The underlip in men and animals, when it hangs down large and loose. "To hang one's fipple," to look disappointed, discontented, or sulky; also, to weep. --John Jamieson's Scottish Etymological Dictionary, 1808

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - A name given to beans, peas, tares, vetches, and such vegetables as have pods; Kent. --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - A fellow who grumpfs at all genuine sports and sits as sour as the devil when all around him are joyous. --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - One who is on the lookout for a fire. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - A disturbance; corrupted from rendezvous. --G.C. Lewis' Glossary of Provincial Herefordshire, 1839

    April 22, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Women who make gloves. --Angelina Parker's Supplement to the Oxfordshire Glossary, 1881

    April 22, 2018

  • (adjective) - Corpulent early 1600s. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

    April 22, 2018

  • deep red

    April 22, 2018

  • deep red

    April 22, 2018

  • light blue

    April 22, 2018

  • scarlet

    April 22, 2018

  • (gris-de-lin, or flax blossom

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A shade of brown of the color of a faded leaf. Anglicised as feulemort, fillamort, filemot, phillemot, and philomot. French, literally "dead leaf." --C.A.M. Fennell's The Stanford Dictionary of Anglicised Words and Phrases, 1964 (2) To make a countryman understand what feuillemorte colour signifies it might suffice to tell him, 'tis the colour of withered leaves falling in Autumn. --John Locke's Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, 1690

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - A patient waiter for good fortune. --Alexander Warrack's Scots Dialect Dictionary, 1911

    April 22, 2018

  • (noun) - A person who stands upon a cliff or elevated part of the seacoast in the time of the herring fishery to point out to the fishermen by signs the course of the shoals of fish. From French conduire to conduct, guide. -- Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 22, 2018

  • (verb) - To be willing to fight; Isle of Wight. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 22, 2018

Comments for Gammerstang

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  • Calm down a bit. If you post too many comments in a row it floods them off the Community page before anyone actually gets a chance to see them.

    April 23, 2018