Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A large, often rounded vessel of earthenware, glass, or metal with a small mouth, a handle, and usually a stopper or cap.
  • n. The amount that a jug can hold.
  • n. A small pitcher.
  • n. Slang A jail.
  • n. Vulgar Slang A woman's breasts.
  • transitive v. To stew (a hare, for example) in an earthenware jug or jar.
  • transitive v. Slang To put into jail.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A serving vessel or container, circular in cross-section and typically higher than it is wide, with a relatively small mouth or spout, a handle and often a stopper or top.
  • n. The amount that a jug can hold.
  • n. Jail.
  • n. A woman's breasts.
  • n. A kettle.
  • v. To stew in an earthenware jug etc.
  • v. To put into jail.
  • v. To utter a sound like "jug", as certain birds do, especially the nightingale.
  • v. To nestle or collect together in a covey.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A vessel, usually of coarse earthenware, with a swelling belly and narrow mouth, and having a handle on one side.
  • n. A pitcher; a ewer.
  • n. A prison; a jail; a lockup.
  • n. A woman's breasts.
  • transitive v. To seethe or stew, as in a jug or jar placed in boiling water.
  • transitive v. To commit to jail; to imprison.
  • intransitive v. To utter a sound resembling this word, as certain birds do, especially the nightingale.
  • intransitive v. To nestle or collect together in a covey; -- said of quails and partridges.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A vessel, usually made of earthenware, metal, or glass, of various sizes and shapes, and generally provided with a handle or ear, used for holding and conveying liquors; a drinking-vessel; a pitcher; a ewer; in the United States, specifically, an earthenware vessel with a swelling or a cylindrical body, a handle, and a narrow neck and orifice, usually stopped by a cork. As a quantity of ale or beer, a jug is usually a pint.
  • n. A prison; a jail: often called the stone jug.
  • n. A low woman.
  • To put into a jug; cook by putting into a jug, and this into boiling water.
  • To commit to jail; imprison.
  • To nestle together; collect in a covey, as partridges: sometimes used as transitive with reflexive pronoun.
  • To utter a particular sound resembling this word, as certain birds do, especially the nightingale.
  • n. A sound fancied to resemble the note uttered by the nightingale and some other birds.
  • n. An act of worship by a Brahman supposed to give him preternatural power.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the quantity contained in a jug
  • v. stew in an earthenware jug
  • n. a large bottle with a narrow mouth
  • v. lock up or confine, in or as in a jail

Etymologies

Middle English jugge.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Comments

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  • To cook in an earthenware pot, as in this 1854 recipe for jugged hare: Link

    April 19, 2011

  • An informal name for the Scots pint, equal to about 1.80 U.S. liquid quarts (1.7 liters). Specifically, the jug of Stirling, the actual vessel on display at the Stirling Museum, was the legal standard for Scottish volume measurements before British Imperial units.

    November 6, 2007

  • October 28, 2007