Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One that tumbles, especially an acrobat or gymnast.
  • n. A drinking glass, originally with a rounded bottom.
  • n. A flat-bottomed glass having no handle, foot, or stem.
  • n. The contents of such a drinking glass.
  • n. A toy made with a weighted rounded base so that it can rock over and then right itself.
  • n. One of a breed of domestic pigeons characteristically tumbling or somersaulting in flight.
  • n. A piece in a gunlock that forces the hammer forward by action of the mainspring.
  • n. The part in a lock that releases the bolt when moved by a key.
  • n. The drum of a clothes dryer.
  • n. A tumbling box.
  • n. A projecting piece on a revolving or rocking part in a mechanism that transmits motion to the part it engages.
  • n. The rocking frame that moves a gear into place in a selective transmission, as in an automobile.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who tumbles; one who plays tricks by various motions of the body; an acrobat.
  • n. A movable obstruction in a lock, consisting of a lever, latch, wheel, slide, or the like, which must be adjusted to a particular position by a key or other means before the bolt can be thrown in locking or unlocking.
  • n. A piece attached to, or forming part of, the hammer of a gunlock, upon which the mainspring acts and in which are the notches for sear point to enter.
  • n. A drinking glass that has no stem, foot, or handle — so called because such glasses originally had a pointed or convex base and could not be set down without spilling. This compelled the drinker to finish his measure.
  • n. A variety of the domestic pigeon remarkable for its habit of tumbling, or turning somersaults, during its flight.
  • n. A beverage cup, typically made of stainless steel, that is broad at the top and narrow at the bottom commonly used in India.
  • n. A dog of a breed that tumbles when pursuing game, formerly used in hunting rabbits.
  • n. A kind of cart; a tumbrel.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who tumbles; one who plays tricks by various motions of the body; an acrobat.
  • n. A movable obstruction in a lock, consisting of a lever, latch, wheel, slide, or the like, which must be adjusted to a particular position by a key or other means before the bolt can be thrown in locking or unlocking.
  • n. A piece attached to, or forming part of, the hammer of a gunlock, upon which the mainspring acts and in which are the notches for the sear point to enter.
  • n. A drinking glass, without a foot or stem; -- so called because originally it had a pointed or convex base, and could not be set down with any liquor in it, thus compelling the drinker to finish his measure.
  • n. A variety of the domestic pigeon remarkable for its habit of tumbling, or turning somersaults, during its flight.
  • n. A breed of dogs that tumble when pursuing game. They were formerly used in hunting rabbits.
  • n. A kind of cart; a tumbrel.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A wheel or drum with revolving paddles, used in tanning hides.
  • n. One who tumbles; one who performs by turning somersaults, walking on the hands, etc., as a mountebank.
  • n. One of the religious sect known as Dunkers. See Dunker.
  • n. A breed of domestic pigeons which perform certain aërial evolutions called tumbling, during which they fall through the air for a distance before making play with their wings.
  • n. A kind of greyhound formerly used in coursing rabbits: so called in allusion to his characteristic motions and springs.
  • n. A porpoise.
  • n. The aquatic larva of a mosquito, gnat, or other member of the Culicidæ; a wriggler: so called from the manner in which they roll over and over in the water.
  • n. A figure or toy representing a fat person, usually a mandarin, sitting with crossed legs. The base of the figure is rounded, so as to rock at a touch.
  • n. One of a band of London reckless profligates in the early part of the eighteenth century.
  • n. A drinking-glass.
  • n. A sort of spring-latch in a lock which detains the bolt so as to prevent its motion until a key lifts it and sets the bolt at liberty.
  • n. Same as tumbling-box.
  • n. In a gun-lock, a piece of the nature of a lever, attached to the pivot of the hammer of the lock, and swiveled to the tip of the mainspring, which, when the hammer is released by pulling the trigger, forces the hammer violently forward, causing it to strike and explode the charge. See also cut under gun-lock.
  • n. A form of printing-machine which rocks or tumbles to the impression-surface.
  • n. Nautical, one of the movable pins for the engagement of the cat-head stopper and shank-painter.
  • n. In weaving, any one of a set of levers (also called coupers) from which in some forms of loom the heddles are suspended.
  • n. Same as tumbrel, 1.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a gymnast who performs rolls and somersaults and twists etc.
  • n. a glass with a flat bottom but no handle or stem; originally had a round bottom
  • n. a movable obstruction in a lock that must be adjusted to a given position (as by a key) before the bolt can be thrown
  • n. pigeon that executes backward somersaults in flight or on the ground

Etymologies

Sense 2a, from the fact that it would tumble if put down.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
tumble +‎ -er (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A Persian despises a wine-glass; a tumbler is his measure.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Between it and the tumbler was a hyphen of wet blisters: droplets of spilled booze.

    Over the Edge

  • I might break a tumbler to be sure, but I should have the full enjoyment of it while it lasted.

    Girls and Women

  • Whiskey or rum taken unmixed from a tumbler is a knock-down blow to temperance, but the little thimbleful of brandy, or Chartreuse, or

    Complete Project Gutenberg Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Works

  • We see this exemplified in England, where the common tumbler, which is valued only for its flight, does not differ much from its parent-form, the Eastern tumbler; whereas the short-faced tumbler has been prodigiously modified, from being valued, not for its flight, but for other qualities.

    The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I.

  • You may now see the cluster, and may not; but they will spread out in marching, and give a good chance to see her majesty, when a tumbler is the most convenient thing to set over her.

    Mysteries of Bee-keeping Explained

  • Now if your tumbler was a hundred or a thousand times as large, the air would prevent the water from coming in, just as it does in this instance.

    The Diving Bell Or, Pearls to be Sought for

  • Whether this was his habit, or whether it was merely an accidental compliance with the tavern etiquette of taking something in the house which we visit, the claret was brought to him instantly, as if it had been ready prepared, together with a large glass of the kind now called a tumbler, and a single biscuit.

    The King's Highway

  • Seriously, when you need help getting the idea tumbler turning, what do you do?

    Shaister Miester Do Da

  • With the exception of the "tumbler," commercially made compost bins are derived from one of these two systems.

    Organic Gardener's Composting

Comments

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  • I like the word "Tumblr" less.

    October 30, 2008