Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who engaged in the contests of the pancratium.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who engaged in the contests of the pancratium.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A combatant or competitor in the pancratium.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And yet, Socrates, rhetoric should be used like any other competitive art, not against everybody-the rhetorician ought not to abuse his strength any more than a pugilist or pancratiast or other master of fence; because he has powers which are more than a match either for friend or enemy, he ought not therefore to strike, stab, or slay his friends.

    Plato's Gorgias - Selected Moments

  • Arcadians, Antiochus, the pancratiast; and on that of the Eleians,

    Hellenica

  • You cannot mean to say that because Polydamas, the pancratiast, is stronger than we are, and finds the eating of beef conducive to his bodily strength, that to eat beef is therefore equally for our good who are weaker than he is, and right and just for us?

    The Republic by Plato ; translated by Benjamin Jowett

  • For I think that what makes a pancratiast beautiful, makes a wrestler to be not good, and a runner to be most ridiculous; and he who is beautiful for the Pentathlon, is very ugly for wrestling.

    The Discourses of Epictetus

  • He who can fling forward his legs in a certain way, and move them fast and far, is good at running; he who can grip and hold down is good at wrestling; he who can drive an adversary from his ground with the right blow is a good boxer: he who can do both the last is a good pancratiast, while he who can do all is an ‘all-round’ athlete.

    Rhetoric

  • In the application of thy principles thou must be like the pancratiast, not like the gladiator; for the gladiator lets fall the sword which he uses and is killed; but the other always has his hand, and needs to do nothing else than use it.

    XII

  • Antiochus, the pancratiast; and on that of the Eleians, Archidamus.

    Hellenica

  • And yet, Socrates, rhetoric should be used like any other competitive art, not against everybody, -- the rhetorician ought not to abuse his strength any more than a pugilist or pancratiast or other master of fence; -- because he has powers which are more than a match either for friend or enemy, he ought not therefore to strike, stab, or slay his friends.

    Gorgias

  • Passing for a moment to minor accomplishments, we find that Charlemagne excelled in athletic and gymnastic exercises; he was a _pancratiast_.

    Theological Essays and Other Papers — Volume 2

  • I never knew what the true pancratiast was before; they are simply made up of fighting, not like the two Acarnanian brothers who fight with their bodies only, but this pair of heroes, besides being perfect in the use of their bodies, are invincible in every sort of warfare; for they are capital at fighting in armour, and will teach the art to any one who pays them; and also they are most skilful in legal warfare; they will plead themselves and teach others to speak and to compose speeches which will have an effect upon the courts.

    The EUTHYDEMUS

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.