Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One who performs on a tightrope or a slack rope.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. tightrope walker

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A ropewalker or ropedancer.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A performer on a stretched rope; a rope-walker or rope-dancer.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an acrobat who performs on a tightrope or slack rope

Etymologies

From Latin fūnambulus : fūnis, rope + ambulāre, to walk.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French funambule or its source, Latin funambulus, from funis ‘rope’ + ambulare ‘walk’. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Having looked in up, in retrospect “funambulist” sounds far more interesting than the common term [3] most people use.

    A Progressive on the Prairie » Beating the rush on a National Book Award winner » Print

  • Having looked in up, in retrospect “funambulist” sounds far more interesting than the common term most people use.

    Beating the rush on a National Book Award winner « A Progressive on the Prairie

  • It begins by referring to the “funambulist” at the heart of the novel.

    Beating the rush on a National Book Award winner « A Progressive on the Prairie

  • ~~~~~~~French Vocabulary~~~~~ tchatche (tchatcher) = to chat; la brocante (f) = second-hand goods, fleamarket; le brocanteur (m) = seller at a fleamarket; portugais = Portugeuse; français = French; le funambulist = tightrope walker; le pichet = pitcher; le papier (m) à bulles = plastic wrap with "bubbles"

    Characters

  • It's an extraordinary quality bartenders have; a bar or, in this case, a lounge, can be quite adverse and hectic and easily become chaotic, yet bartenders - good bartenders, that is, go about the storm of hands and impatient glares and fidgets with a frightful calm, riding a teetering wire between cordiality of social obligation and quickness and precision of hand with the balance of a world-class funambulist.

    Grant Whitney Harvey: Moonshadows: Part 1

  • That the scion of one of the oldest-established funambulist families in the land should come to this, should give up this gay life of sawdust, music, sequins, and romance to become a bean-counter.

    Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine

  • The bow (like the funambulist with the soles of his slippers fresh chalked) kept glancing on and off, till we hoped he would be off altogether and break his neck; and now the least harsh and grating of the cords snaps up in the fiddler's face, and a crude one is to be applied; and now -- but what is the use of pursuing the description?

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, Number 361, November, 1845.

  • Sometimes a thrill of delicious sensation would pass through the audience when the funambulist missed his footing and was dashed dead on the orchestra, or the boy tumbled from his balanced pole and broke a leg.

    Gathering Clouds: A Tale of the Days of St. Chrysostom

  • Persian poet who left out all the A's (as well as the poetry) in his verses, or of that other French funambulist whose sonnet in honour of

    De Libris: Prose and Verse

  • A funambulist may harass his muscles and risk his neck on the tight-rope, but hardly to entertain his own family.

    Biographical Essays

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • The kind of ambulist you want at your party. Especially a cool guy like this!

    December 8, 2009