Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To move about briskly and playfully; frolic.
  • transitive v. To search (a person) for something concealed, especially a weapon, by passing the hands quickly over clothes or through pockets.
  • n. An energetic, playful movement; a gambol.
  • n. The act of frisking.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Lively; brisk; frolicsome; frisky.
  • n. A frolic; a fit of wanton gaiety; a gambol: a little playful skip or leap.
  • v. to frolic, gambol, skip, dance, leap
  • v. to search somebody by feeling their clothes

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Lively; brisk; frolicsome; frisky.
  • adj. A frolic; a fit of wanton gayety; a gambol: a little playful skip or leap.
  • intransitive v. To leap, skip, dance, or gambol, in fronc and gayety.
  • transitive v. To search (a person) for concealed weapons or other objects, by patting the clothing to detect objects underneath.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Lively; brisk; frisky.
  • n. A frolic; a gambol; a dance; a merry-making.
  • To leap, skip, prance, or gambol, as in frolic.
  • To freshen, as the wind.
  • To squander idly; dissipate in sport: with away.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of searching someone for concealed weapons or illegal drugs
  • v. search as for concealed weapons by running the hands rapidly over the clothing and through the pockets
  • v. play boisterously

Etymologies

From Middle English frisk, lively, from Old French frisque, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English frisk, from Old French frisque ("lively, jolly, blithe, fine, spruce, gay"), of Germanic origin, perhaps from Middle Dutch frisc ("fresh") or Old High German frisc ("fresh"), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (“fresh”). Cognate with Icelandic frískur ("frisky, fresh"). More at fresh. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • To justify a patdown of the driver or a passenger during a traffic stop, however, just as in the case of a pedestrian reasonably suspected of criminal activity, the police must harbor reasonable suspicion that the person subjected to the frisk is armed and dangerous.

    Sui Generis--a New York law blog:

  • Well, since that was a Fourth Amendment case, and the reasonable suspicion standard has other Fourth Amendment applications, (such as when a Terry v. Ohio type stop and frisk is valid,) the discussion in Brignoni-Ponce would apply to the Fourth Amendment generally.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » What Will Kagan Say about AZ Immigration Law

  • The frisk is a quick search of an individual for weapons, evidence, or contraband.

    FM 7-98 Appendix C - Operations and Techniques

  • And any evidence from those non-searches can or can not beused? can. because any time a cop is lawfully in a position to observe x, x is admissible. doesn’t mean a frisk is a searchwhit (Quote)

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Shahzad and Miranda Rights

  • May 7, 2010, 12: 51 pm whit says: whit: can. because any time a cop is lawfully in a position to observe x, x is admissible. doesn’t mean a frisk is a search and to be more clear, see plain view doctrine and open view doctrine. whit: can. because any time a cop is lawfully in a position to observe x, x is admissible. doesn’t mean a frisk is a search

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Shahzad and Miranda Rights

  • Johnson's life, bringing him into scenes and among characters widely contrasted with his habitual surroundings, is one instance, and the memorable midnight "frisk" in the neighborhood of the Temple is another, among many that might be cited.

    Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 22, November, 1878 of Popular Literature and Science

  • And older persons, not yet altogether regenerate, are apt to have a weakness for a man who was willing to be knocked up at three in the morning by some young roysterers, and turn out with them for a "frisk" about the streets and taverns and down the river in a boat.

    Dr. Johnson and His Circle

  • Terahertz waves pass through non-conducting materials such as clothes, paper, wood and brick and so cameras sensitive to them can peer inside envelopes, into living rooms and "frisk" people at distance.

    Gorilla Radio blog

  • The statement says Dunn told detectives that he told the women that he was going to "frisk" them, then fondled them for his own gratification rather than his safety.

    KVUE - Home

  • When they encounter another cell, they "frisk" it to determine if it is normal or infected, cancerous, or foreign to the body.

    Biosingularity

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