garyth123 has looked up 65 words, created 33 lists, listed 694 words, written 354 comments, added 134 tags, and loved 10 words.

Comments by garyth123

  • zed's dead baby, zed's dead

    October 13, 2011

  • hope you get round to reading cod then, it's good!

    April 24, 2011

  • like thanks:)

    April 23, 2011

  • I shall say this only once...

    September 26, 2009

  • My workmate, who hails from Lossiemouth in the North of Scotland, uses this expression to suggest someone is confused, incompetent, or inebriated. Can also be used of a female by substituting the word boy with the word quine.

    July 11, 2009

  • A snazzy way to say goodbye, or perhaps cheerio, when ending a mobile 'phone (or cell phone) conversation. So cool:)

    June 27, 2009

  • J Peasmold Gruntfuttock to be exact.

    June 9, 2009

  • Define barmy.

    May 19, 2009

  • Goodnight from the newsreaders on the Fast Show.

    May 5, 2009

  • Alan Freeman.

    May 5, 2009

  • Possibly the state of holy matrimony viewed from spinster or bachelorhood, in a grass is always greener way of looking at things.

    May 2, 2009

  • The most important concept in the information foraging theory is information scent. (Wikipedia article on information foraging.)

    World's Best Headlines: BBC News
    "rich in information scent, clearly summarizing the target article"

    Jakob Nielsen praises the BBC.

    April 27, 2009

  • See signature dish

    April 26, 2009

  • From the Wikipedia: At its weakest, the term can simply mean 'chef's specials' which are in no way unique or even particularly unusual.

    April 25, 2009

  • Your culinary portfolio, or something equally absurd.

    April 25, 2009

  • If you cook something a lot, enjoy cooking it and sharing it with others, what is it called?

    Your signature dish.

    April 25, 2009

  • Do you mean in a Scottish accent?

    April 20, 2009

  • Ah, okay, I get in now, in English you don't sound the 'e' at the end.

    April 20, 2009

  • Hey, thank you very much:)

    April 20, 2009

  • アズキ, formerly spelled adzuki or misspelled aduki according to the Wikipedia. Aduki is how I've always referred to them and seem them referred to in whole food shops.

    April 20, 2009

  • How is it pronounced?

    April 20, 2009

  • To.

    April 19, 2009

  • I must apologise or apologize for my recent outburst but I went to see In the Loop yesterday afternoon, and Malcolm Tucker is something of an inspiration. The Scots: swearing, irn bru, whisky, heart attacks...

    April 19, 2009

  • From.

    April 19, 2009

  • Away and fuck off tae where ye fuckin' came frae then:)

    April 19, 2009

  • mmm!

    April 19, 2009

  • I understood that schmuck was the Yiddish word for the foreskin. See the Wikitionary entry on schmuck and eg Mel Brooks Starts Nonprofit Foundation To Save Word 'Schmuck'.

    In the UK helmet is used in a similar sense.

    April 12, 2009

  • Hyperlinks.

    See Juist Scots Cleeks page.

    April 12, 2009

  • Control, or authority.

    See the Scots Language Centre Scots Language wedding on film.

    April 12, 2009

  • Have not been able to log-in for a while due to stupidity on my part.

    April 12, 2009

  • A scarf.

    Winnie the Pooh has been translated into Scots.

    James Robertson is the translator.

    Itchy coo are the publisher.

    Itchy Cool is their website for bairns.

    April 12, 2009

  • Mike Yarwood, Rory Bremner, John Culshaw and so forth. I'm sorry I don't know the names of any American impressionists.

    March 28, 2009

  • I'm thinking of how Sir Sean Connery would pronounce "iconic site" at least in the mouths of what I think are termed impressionists. (Mike Yarwood not Monet.)

    March 28, 2009

  • "SCOTLAND has won an international contest to host a cutting-edge operation which aims to transform the way companies run major projects around the world and is expected to create about 200 jobs at an iconic site near Glasgow."
    Hi-tech inward investment on course to create 200 jobs


    What is meant by an iconic site?

    Jonathan Meades wrote recently about the overuse of this word: ICONIC: THE ADJECTIVE OF THE AGE

    March 28, 2009

  • "This is cruder stuff than I usually go for. Abstruse financial analysis provides a more satisfying jolt of fright, dread, and incomprehension. One god-awful prediction that dances through my head at three in the morning is the “coming dollar debasement trade,�? which will happen when the Chinese and the rest of the world give up, en masse, on our currency as a reserve. The leading nightmare peddlers see it as nothing less than the end of civilized America." Pessimism Porn nymag

    March 28, 2009

  • See goodwinism.

    March 26, 2009

  • Someone in a comment at the online guardian has suggested adopting this as a synonym for "greed" as a means of bringing lasting shame to Sir Fred Goodwin. In the manner of boycott.

    March 26, 2009

  • Does a dog have the buddha-nature?

    March 23, 2009

  • See away.

    March 20, 2009

  • Run counterclockwise around the sheep.

    March 20, 2009

  • Run round the sheep clockwise.

    March 20, 2009

  • the sheep shearing season

    March 19, 2009

  • a sheep

    March 19, 2009

  • A lark, or skylark.

    March 18, 2009

  • See The Watergaw at the poetry archive.

    March 18, 2009

  • 'We see children as pestilent'

    March 17, 2009

  • Robe chant or kesa verse.

    March 17, 2009

  • Really Irish, but used for itinerant Irish workers who came to Scotland looking for work.

    March 15, 2009

  • condescend

    March 14, 2009

  • In the news today. RBS avoided £500m of tax in global deals.


    The previous management, led by Sir Fred Goodwin - who is now retired with a £700,000-a-year pension - presided over a massive expansion of so-called "structured trades". These are huge deals across national borders, to make profit out of tax avoidance. They are not illegal, but secretively exploit gaps in different countries' tax laws.

    March 13, 2009

  • In Scotland, a man who is more interested in women than in drinking, according to Billy Connolly.

    March 10, 2009

  • Self-aware, or self-perceiving.

    March 10, 2009

  • In Scotland (and perhaps all of the UK) this word has a use where the meaning is intended to be something like excellent. And this use can sometimes be ironical.

    March 9, 2009

  • The scientific study of kissing (according to the Wikipedia).

    "Women are subconsciously more attracted to men whose major histocompatibility complex portion of their genome is different from their own, leading to offspring with resistance to a greater number of diseases due to heterosis, and thus having a better chance of survival."

    March 8, 2009

  • In 2008 BBC4 screened a film which told the story of Mrs Mary Whitehouse (a campaigner against 'filth' on TV etc). The film had a couple of good jokes that were meant to suggest that Mrs Whitehouse was obsessed (perhaps neurotically) with sex. One of these was that her original name for her organistaion was—clean up national TV.

    March 8, 2009

  • When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.

    March 6, 2009

  • A festival held in Shetland to celebrate the return of the light. Involves Viking costumes, and long ships.

    March 5, 2009

  • A festival held in Shetland to celebrate the return of the light. Involves Viking costumes, and long ships.

    March 5, 2009

  • I prefer him to Burns.

    March 2, 2009

  • Not so much Scots I'd say as Scottish, for roadsweeper or rubbish collector.

    February 27, 2009

  • See androcentrism. Has a suggestion of mainstream at least to my mind.

    February 25, 2009

  • Recently I read a laundry bag with these words written on it.

    February 24, 2009

  • Gaelic for balls.

    February 20, 2009

  • What is the unit of measurement applied generally to commodities or articles which are available in gigantic quantities?

    (This is one of Myles', Flann's:)

    February 18, 2009

  • In terms of altitude and fittingness describe the necessity of the open list catechism of cliche.

    It's high time!

    February 17, 2009

  • One who slaisters ie speaks drivel.

    February 17, 2009

  • I suppose this means something like slaver.

    You also hear it used as a noun—slaisterer.

    Cf drool.

    February 17, 2009

  • On turning to Davie's 'Epilogue' to The Crisis of the Democratic Intellect one reads that the central core of the idea of democratic intellect means the many - in his own words, 'the ignorant many' - sharing control with 'the few' (the experts) and through discussion arriving at a 'lay consensus' capable of revealing gaps in the expert's point of view (Davie 1986, p.262). There is more than a hint here of the relationship between the Scottish minister and his flock, each keeping the other up to scratch by mutual criticism, just as the minister's suspicion of the congregation was checked and balanced by the congregation's common sense scrutiny of the minister (Young 1996).

    Re-Framing the Democratic Intellect

    February 16, 2009

  • A praying mantis.

    February 15, 2009

  • Title of a Dr John album.

    February 15, 2009

  • A Japanese clettering stick:)

    February 15, 2009

  • See eunoia quotes.

    February 15, 2009

  • How do you get rid of oxter guff? Start using oxter scoosh! Deodorant that is.

    February 15, 2009

  • I did wonder about that, but not being a Gaelic speaker I had to rely on Alastair McIntosh's rendering. I found it in his book Soil and Soul.

    February 15, 2009

  • The Spirit of Kindliness.

    February 14, 2009

  • Apparently a notorious example of a false friend.

    February 13, 2009

  • I came across it in Anthony Burgess' novel Earthly Powers.

    February 9, 2009

  • A Sir Les Patterson euphemism for masturbation.

    February 8, 2009

  • Carol Thatcher used this term in relation to a black tennis player and was fired from a BBC show. Carol Thatcher is the daughter of the former Prime Minister Mrs Margaret Thatcher. On this week's The News Quiz one panellist commented I blame the parents.

    See
    For me, golliwogs have lost their juju
    for an interesting view of the issues involved.

    February 8, 2009

  • It's well known that playing the cello can do no harm to the privates; fiddling on the other hand...(this joke was first cracked by Jeremy Hardy on last week's News Quiz on BBC Radio 4).

    February 7, 2009

  • From Ivan Illich, and used by Alastair McIntosh in his book Soil and Soul to describe the way of life in the Hebrides before the rise of a money based economy (as late as the 1960s).

    February 5, 2009

  • Listening to Fry's English delight as I footle about on the web this Sunday PM.

    Women on a ship were allowed to lie in bed for an hour longer by showing a leg.

    Make that pootle.

    February 1, 2009

  • time for bed

    February 1, 2009

  • See lost in translation

    February 1, 2009

  • It seems to mean 'Our Lord's beast', or at least that is what the lieveheersbeestje part means, and that is the word I somewhere came across recently. However I picked up Meeldauwlieveheersbeestje when I thought of adding to the comments here. Meeldauwlieveheersbeestje seems to refer to the orange ladybird, and I've discovered that the orange ladybird feeds on mildew.

    February 1, 2009

  • A Scots word for sweetheart. Burns uses it John Anderson, my jo for example. Like other 2 letter words it can be very useful in Scrabble.

    February 1, 2009

  • Meeldauwlieveheersbeestje in Dutch.

    January 31, 2009

  • see thurible

    January 31, 2009

  • Horrible yet true.


    Shaken survivors of economic blast ask: what went wrong?

    January 30, 2009

  • You might want to add armstrong numbers aka narcissistic numbers.

    January 28, 2009

  • In number theory a narcissistic number is a number that in a given base is the sum of its own digits to the power of the number of digits.

    153 being a well known example.

    See pluperfect digital invariant (PPDI)

    January 28, 2009

  • hot

    January 28, 2009

  • Long ago when the world was young BBC Scotland produced Stanley Baxter (a Scottish comedy actor) in his own show which included a section entitled Parliamo Glesgae, a spoof on a typical 60s language learning TV show.

    This is the only Glasgow saying I remember from the show, and the reason for that is the very memorable phrase that was used to illustrate its meaning: erra rerra perra doos.

    Imagine two young men on Sauchiehall Street in Glasgow lasciviously eying the figures of young women as they pass by. When a particularly well endowed woman goes past one friend nudges the other and mutters erra rerra perra doos--there is a rare pair of boobs (I suppose you might render the word doos in this way).

    Really Stanley Baxter was just making fun of the Glasgow accent.

    January 28, 2009

  • Another Islay malt.

    January 27, 2009

  • John Wells and John Fortune wrote a very funny book about a man who loved trees. A Melon For Ecstasy.

    January 26, 2009

  • I'm one.

    January 26, 2009

  • ...whether a man who has been born blind and who has learnt to distinguish and name a globe and a cube by touch, would be able to distinguish and name these objects simply by sight, once he had been enabled to see.

    http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/molyneux-problem/

    January 26, 2009

  • A member of a Baltic people constituting the main population of Latvia.

    January 25, 2009

  • Lithuanians and Letts do it
    Let's do it, let's fall in love

    Cole Porter

    January 25, 2009

  • A chap on the BBC's World This Weekend has just now helpfully informed us "That is, the neighbourhood." This was in a piece on the effect that Barak Obama is having on Black Amercian youth.

    January 25, 2009

  • I've experienced email bankruptcy especially with Hotmail email accounts.

    January 25, 2009

  • The shortest word in the French language to contain all the vowels. Cf eunoia.

    January 25, 2009

  • "Even once we've found someone that we don't want to overlook, science has a thing or two to say about how to make love at first sight last a lifetime: 'To kickstart the levels of dopamine in the ventral tegmental, do novel things,' says Fisher. 'Constantly change your schedule so you never get bogged down in each other's routine.'" The Guardian Dating Supplement 24th January 2009.

    January 25, 2009

  • "Sexual relations are better if the male perineum is in good shape." Tips from N Sarkozy's trainer Julie Imperiali. In The Guardian This Week What They Said of Saturday 24th January 2009.

    January 25, 2009

  • What will it be - some soothing herb tea?
    That might be just the thing
    Lets say we spike it with deludin
    Or else - maybe tonight a hand of solitaire

    Steely Dan Gaslighting Abbie

    An imaginary drug.

    January 24, 2009

  • One plush summer you come to me ripe and ready
    And bad through and through
    With that deep mystical soul synergy pumping steady
    Between me and you
    Lovin' all the beautiful work we've done, cara mia
    And its barely july
    If we keep on boppin until labor day
    Lil miz abbie - bye bye

    Steely Dan Gaslighting Abbie

    January 24, 2009

  • ...Some economists require a fall in GDP of 10 per cent or more before a recession would be referred to as a depression (see Wikipedia article on Depression (economics).

    It would seem a depression hasn't been defined in the same way a recession has.

    January 24, 2009

  • ...Some economists require a fall in GDP of 10 per cent or more before a recession would be referred to as a depression (see Wikipedia article on Depression (economics).

    It would seem a depression hasn't been defined in the same way a recession has.

    January 24, 2009

  • @reesetee I have worked briefly for Amazon Dev Centre Scotland so asin means one and only one thing to me;)

    January 23, 2009

  • Amazon Standard Identification Number

    January 20, 2009

  • I see what you mean chained_bear. No problem.

    January 19, 2009

  • I've never read HF. (Veneration of Mark Twain is one of the roots of our current intellectual stalemate. Ignatius J Reilly:)

    January 19, 2009

  • A word coined to describe Margaret Thacher's style especially in regard to controlling her cabinet. I think.

    January 19, 2009

  • Ah I see. I couldn't really make sense of it. (Actually even with the knowledge that it's a reference to HF I still don't get it.)

    January 19, 2009

  • This word occurs in the song Moon River.

    Moon River.

    January 19, 2009

  • c_b: what about the italic capital a: at How Do I Use This Site?

    January 19, 2009

  • Most Scottish people would object to

    of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language

    we're Scottish or Scots. Scotch nowadays would only really be used to refer to the drink, or eggs, or mist...well certainly not the people.

    January 18, 2009

  • Caller, fresh, cool. There is no exact English synonym for this word. " Caller herrin," " Caller haddie," and "Caller ow" are familiar cries to Edinburgh people, and to all strangers who
    visit that beautiful city.

    Sae sweet his voice, sae smooth his tongue,

    His breath's like caller air ;
    His very foot has music in't
    When he comes up the stair.

    MICKLE : There's nae Luck

    about the House.
    Upon a simmer Sunday morn,
    When Nature's face is fair,
    I walked forth to view the corn
    And snuff the caller air.

    BURNS: The Holy Fair.

    From Mackay's Dictionary of Lowland Scotch.

    January 18, 2009

  • A’ ye wha canna stand sae sicker,
    Whan twice ye’ve toom’d the big
    ars’dbicker,
    Mix caller oysters wi your liquor,
    And I’m your debtor
    If greedy priest or drouthy vicar
    Will thole it better.

    Auld Reekie’s 18th-century James Dean

    sicker?
    toom'd
    big ars'dbicker?

    January 18, 2009

  • Natto miso is very nice.

    January 18, 2009

  • Scottish for paper-folding, or origami. See Flypit Paper:-Origami in Scots.

    January 18, 2009

  • In Scots this means fresh. Fergusson has a line I think about caller oysters (or whatever oysters is in Scots, I'll check).

    January 18, 2009

  • An exclamation intended to convey something like if only that were the case.

    January 18, 2009

  • I first came across this word in connection with Robert Anton Wilson (or possibly Terence McKenna). The Psychonaut quotes Wilson using zetetic.

    January 18, 2009

  • At a recent conference of logicians there was only a single toilet facility for 600 attendees.

    What stock example of a logical statement does this situation suggest?

    January 17, 2009

  • Or possibly gets my goat up.

    January 17, 2009

  • gavagai!

    January 17, 2009

  • Should be gets on my goat I think. See WWW on get one's goat.

    January 17, 2009

  • Often used to describe the flavours of single malts esp those from Islay esp Laphroaig.

    January 17, 2009

  • A form of gentle admonition.

    January 17, 2009

  • You are not there.

    January 17, 2009

  • It's a distillery on the isle of Islay (pronounced Isla) Laphroaig. '...the name means "the beautiful hollow by the broad bay"' see Laphroaig at the Wikipedia.

    January 17, 2009

  • Pronounced la froyg.

    January 17, 2009

  • Surely this is a verb. To swither means to be undecided, or something like that.

    January 17, 2009

  • How people in Shetland say, "How are you?"

    January 16, 2009

  • The Scottish folk group Old Blind Dogs come from the North East of Scotland. They have a CD entitled "Fit?", which in Doric would mean "What?" (perhaps an exasperated "What?"). When I was viewing the Amazon page for "Fit?" once they were also trying to sell me aerobic fitness dvds, leotards, books on fitness etc. Most amusing.

    January 16, 2009

  • In Doric fit means "what". It can also mean foot (Scots), and by extension shoe. And it can have its usual meaning in English. Therefore it is perfectly feasible that you may hear the following sentence uttered (and understood) in a shoe shop in the Aberdeenshire area:

    Fit fit fits fit fit?

    January 15, 2009

  • It's a great book and he is a funny-sad character.

    January 15, 2009

  • Changed my mind about this word as the awful Mr Thwaites in Slaves of Solitude uses it.

    January 15, 2009

  • It seems to be yeah-but-no-but.

    January 13, 2009

  • I take it this is what the Little Britain character says...or is it yeah but no but. Vicky Pollard...that's her.

    January 13, 2009

  • see also dangleberry urban dictionary entry for a comparison of these two words

    January 12, 2009

  • see also dangleberry

    January 12, 2009

  • Or rather he said that "printing money" was referred to as quantative easing by economists.

    January 10, 2009

  • Please see mole-groomer.

    January 10, 2009

  • James Naughtie said this AM that this meant "printing money".

    January 10, 2009

  • a person who encourages others (who are in possession of privileged information) to divulge whatever they may know and is to the public good, in other words, someone who encourages others to spill the beans.

    January 10, 2009

  • Well Edina is the poetical name for Edinburgh. But what do you call a palindrome at the level of words?

    January 10, 2009

  • At the level of the words this is palindromic. Does anyone know if there is a word to describe this?

    January 10, 2009

  • Yes I spotted that ambiguity a bit later but no I was just looking for an alternative for barber shop.

    January 10, 2009

  • Yes I'm on Flickr but that wasn't my Flickr account with the barber shop photo. And I just recently added Wordie to my groups (I'm a sucker for this kind of thing).

    January 10, 2009

  • And thanks gangerh for providing this list.

    January 10, 2009

  • Ah yes so I see tonsorialist. Thank you reesetee.

    January 10, 2009

  • No, I was thinking something more erudite sounding.

    January 10, 2009

  • What is a fancy way of saying a barber shop?

    January 10, 2009

  • An Edinburgh tonsorialist advertises a loyalty scheme with a sign, with this phrase printed on it, placed in their shop window.

    January 9, 2009

  • to steal crude oil, according to the BBC on PM this evening (08/01/2009)

    January 9, 2009

  • Stillness practices in the Eastern Orthodox Church.

    January 8, 2009

  • When it was hip to be hep I was hep. Dave Frishberg.

    January 8, 2009

  • I thought this was called pyrites -- fool's gold.

    January 7, 2009

  • see tathata

    January 6, 2009

  • Sexual intercourse, see ugandan discussions.

    January 5, 2009

  • Re Wordia -- I don't get it;)

    January 5, 2009

  • Nothing to do with the halting probability of a randomly chosen computer program, but something considered essential for good health:)

    January 5, 2009

  • I imagine that this has something to do with drinking beer.

    January 5, 2009

  • Eranu:)

    January 5, 2009

  • Vic and Bob's word for the right answer?

    January 4, 2009

  • Vic and Bob's word for the wrong answer I think.

    January 4, 2009

  • Thanks plethora.

    January 4, 2009

  • Especially motors.

    January 4, 2009

  • Are you trying to take the piss? (An expression I dislike btw.)

    January 4, 2009

  • Tristram's Uncle Toby comes to mind.

    January 4, 2009

  • Well it's not meant to be every word I know just the ones that stand out in my mind for some reason or other. It's meant in contradistinction to my wordies list which is a list of words that wordie has introduced me to. I've yet to master the venerable wordie skill of naming lists appropriately and/or amusingly.

    January 4, 2009

  • I desperately need to improve my vocabulary; can you recommend any good internet resources;)

    January 4, 2009

  • The play Gaslight (which gives rise to the verb form of this word) was written by Patrick Hamilton.

    January 4, 2009

  • A dip in the waters of the Firth of Forth at South Queensferry on January 1st. See dook.

    January 3, 2009

  • Of course as recently came to light this has significance for neo-Nazis.

    January 3, 2009

  • The weirdest taste.

    January 3, 2009

  • The night on which Hitler and Goebels chose to commit suicide.

    January 3, 2009

  • Ω Chaitin's constant

    January 3, 2009

  • quick, see wiki wiki

    January 3, 2009

  • very quick

    January 3, 2009

  • see the principle of factor sparsity, or the law of the vital few, or the pareto effect

    January 2, 2009

  • a small proportion of causes produce a large proportion of results aka the 80:20 rule

    January 2, 2009

  • Ko, I believe.

    January 2, 2009

  • plural of pentimento

    January 2, 2009

  • 劫 (uncountable) in Go a game shape where the Ko rule, prohibiting repetitious play, applies.

    January 2, 2009

  • a t.fxrape nafrgy

    January 2, 2009

  • Donald Trefusis--he was good.

    January 2, 2009

  • Occurs somewhere in James Joyce's writings.

    January 2, 2009

  • see apodeictic

    January 2, 2009

  • The Guardian used it today in connection with Harold Pinter and a poem he wrote for his wife Antonia Fraser and his first meeting her. It is here

    I didn't know what foudre meant.

    January 1, 2009

  • And how does it translate into English? (The internet is not very clear on answering the question.)

    January 1, 2009

  • Freeman Dyson in today's The Guardian:

    To make radiotelepathy possible, we have only to invent two new technologies, first the direct conversion of neural signals into radio signals and vice versa, and second the placement of microscopic radio transmitters and receivers within the tissue of a living brain.

    ...which ideas and inventions will provide humanity's next leap forward

    January 1, 2009

  • The kind of thing you're always reading in Stevenson and others.

    He seemed grievously put out. "Hoots-toots," said he, "ca' cannie, man--ca' cannie! Bide a day or two. I'm nae warlock, to find a fortune for you in the bottom of a parritch bowl; but just you give me a day or two, and say naething to naebody, and as sure as sure, I'll do the right by you." Kidnapped

    January 1, 2009

  • The kind of thing you're always reading in Stevenson and others.

    He seemed grievously put out. "Hoots-toots," said he, "ca' cannie, man--ca' cannie! Bide a day or two. I'm nae warlock, to find a fortune for you in the bottom of a parritch bowl; but just you give me a day or two, and say naething to naebody, and as sure as sure, I'll do the right by you."

    January 1, 2009

  • Post credit crunch big science?

    January 1, 2009

  • Thanks for the heads up on pusi... whatever it is. My words wot i misspell list is coming into its own (I knew it would). And happy new year to you!

    January 1, 2009

  • Or thought experiment even:)

    January 1, 2009

  • Freeman Dyson spotted a connection--during a chance conversation with Hugh Montgomery--between quantum physics and the prime numbers.

    January 1, 2009

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