Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of implicate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. a charge that implicates someone (usually of wrongdoing).

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mashakada was arrested after police received an anonymous phone call implicating him in the bombing of the Dutch-owned radio studio in Harare.

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • Bass contends detectives did a poor job on the case, in part because they didn't request cell phone or land line records for Whitney Mendez to confirm phone calls implicating Mendez until months after the killings.

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  • The Chechnyan had made calls implicating himself and then, when we caught up with him, confessed.

    Edge

  • In the same way he was still desperately resistant to the notion of implicating his wife.

    The Jigsaw Man

  • He had toyed with the idea of implicating Radwell at this stage, but had decided not to.

    The Fifth Rapunzel

  • All this he joined with what he had just overheard about _a frolic_, and he was rejoiced at the idea of implicating in this business Mr. Russell, whom he disliked.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 01

  • He added that Hizbullah claimed that many of the spies worked for Lebanese telecommunication companies, and could therefore fabricate calls implicating activists in the assassination, to the benefit of Israel.

    JPost.com - Front Page

  • From environmental and population changes to the decline of the nation states there are factors which cannot be hidden by any robocall implicating Obama with Ayers.

    Bloggers.Pakistan

  • Damning accounting records 'implicating' Sarkozy in illegal cash payments are 'found' by police

    WN.com - Articles related to The World-Wonder of modern Bank Profit Making

  • Sources: In order to avoid any debate over implicating the New Jersey Shield Law, I will come clean on my own sources: I grew up in New Jersey and learned about New Jersey's powerful journalists' Shield Law while a student at Rutgers Law School and came to appreciate its nuanced and balanced judicial interpretations as a clerk for former Chief Justice Robert Wilentz of the New Jersey Supreme Court.

    Jonathan Askin: New Jersey's "Too Much Media" Opinion Might Mean Too Little New Media

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