Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To snarl; growl.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See knar.
  • To growl or snarl, as a dog.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Archaic A knot or gnarl in wood; hence, a tough, thickset man; -- written also gnarr.
  • intransitive verb Archaic To gnarl; to snarl; to growl; -- written also gnarr.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun slang Snow.
  • verb To snarl or growl.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Imitative.]

Examples

Comments

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  • Webster 1913:

    n. (OE. knarre, gnarre, akin to OD. knor, G. knorren. Cf. Knar, Knur, Gnarl.) A knot or gnarl in wood; hence, a tough, thickset man; -- written also gnarr. (Archaic)

    He was . . . a thick gnarre. - Chaucer.

    v. i. (imp. & p. p. Gnarred (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Gnarring. See Gnarl.) To gnarl; to snarl; to growl; -- written also gnarr. (Archaic)

    At them he gan to rear his bristles strong, And felly

    gnarre. - Spenser.

    A thousand wants Gnarr at the heels of men. - Tennison.

    July 4, 2007