Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of gnar.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Through all the commotion of the king's visits, the coming and going, the clang of hoofs and clanking of armour, the heaving of hearts and clamour of tongues, he lay lapped in ignorance and ministration, hidden from the world and deaf to the gnarring of its wheels, prisoned in a twilight dungeon, to which Richard's sword had been the key.

    St. George and St. Michael Volume III

  • He woke in terror unspeakable, and would have started up but the moment he moved, the legserpent drew his coils closer, and closer still, and drew and drew until the quaking traitor heard the joints of his bedstead grinding and gnarring.

    The Princess and Curdie

  • There they left him, shutting the great gnarring brazen door of the vault, as they departed for the upper regions of the castle.

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • A philosophical Doctor: A disconsolate Meat - jack, gnarring and creaking with rust and work.

    Past and Present

  • Meat-jack, gnarring and creaking with rust and work; and this, in Scottish dialect, is _its_ Byronian musical Life-philosophy, sung according to ability!

    Past and Present

  • No, is an unfortunate rusty Meat-jack, gnarring and creaking with rust and work; and this, in Scottish dialect, is _its_ Byronian musical Life-philosophy, sung according to ability!

    Past and Present Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII.

  • A philosophical Doctor: A disconsolate Meat-jack, gnarring and creaking with rust and work. (p. 192.) -- The only 'happiness' a brave man ever troubled himself much about, the happiness to get his work done.

    Past and Present Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII.

  • Ever at a certain hour, with preternatural gnarring, growling and screeching, which attended as running bass, there began, in a horrid, semi-articulate, unearthly voice, this song: "Once I was hap-hap-happy, but now I'm _mees_-erable!

    Past and Present

  • Ever at a certain hour, with preternatural gnarring, growling and screeching, which attended as running bass, there began, in a horrid, semi-articulate, unearthly voice, this song: "Once I was hap-hap-happy, but now I'm _mees_erable!

    Past and Present Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII.

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