Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To reverse the winding or twisting of: unwind a ball of yarn.
  • transitive v. To separate the tangled parts of; disentangle.
  • transitive v. To free (someone) of nervous tension or pent-up energy.
  • intransitive v. To become unwound.
  • intransitive v. To become free of nervous tension; relax: liked to unwind with a cocktail before dinner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To wind off; to loose or separate; to untwist; to untwine; as, to unwind thread, to unwind a ball of yarn
  • v. To disentangle
  • v. To relax; to chill out; as, to rest and relieve of stress
  • v. To be or become unwound; to be capable of being unwound or untwisted.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To wind off; to loose or separate, as what or convolved; to untwist; to untwine.
  • transitive v. To disentangle.
  • intransitive v. To be or become unwound; to be capable of being unwound or untwisted.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To wind off; loose or separate, as what is wound or convolved; set free or loose: as, to unwind thread or a ball.
  • To disentangle; free from entanglement.
  • To admit of being unwound; become unwound: as, a skein that unwinds easily.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. become less tense, rest, or take one's ease
  • v. cause to feel relaxed
  • v. reverse the winding or twisting of
  • v. separate the tangles of

Etymologies

From Old English unwindan. See 1st un-, and wind ("to coil"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.