Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An examination using the eyes; a look.
  • noun Field of vision.
  • noun A scene or vista.
  • noun A way of showing or seeing something, as from a particular position or angle.
  • noun An individual and personal perception, judgment, or interpretation; an opinion.
  • noun An aim or intention.
  • noun Consideration or concern.
  • noun Expectation or likelihood.
  • transitive verb To look at, examine, or inspect.
  • transitive verb To watch (a program, for example) on television.
  • transitive verb To survey or study mentally; consider.
  • transitive verb To think of (something) in a particular way; regard: synonym: see.
  • idiom (in view of) Taking into account; in consideration of.
  • idiom (on view) Placed so as to be seen; exhibited.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To see; look on; behold.
  • To examine with the eye; look on with attention, or for the purpose of examining; survey; explore; peruse.
  • To survey intellectually; examine with the mental eye; consider; regard.
  • Synonyms To witness.
  • To scan.
  • To contemplate.
  • To look; take a view.
  • noun The act of viewing, seeing, or beholding; examination by the eye; survey; inspection; look; sight.
  • noun The act of perceiving by the mind; mental survey; intellectual inspection or examination; observation; consideration.
  • noun Power of seeing or perception, either physical or mental; range of vision; reach of sight; extent of prospect.
  • noun That which is viewed, seen, or beheld; something which is looked upon; sight or spectacle presented to the eye or to the mind; scene; prospect.
  • noun A scene as represented by painting, drawing, or photography; a picture or sketch, especially a landscape.
  • noun Manner or mode of looking at things; manner of regarding subjects on which various opinions may be held; judgment; opinion; conception; notion; way of thinking; theory.
  • noun Something looked toward or forming the subject of consideration; intention; design; purpose; aim.
  • noun Appearance; show; aspect.
  • noun In law, an inspection by the jury of property or a place the appearance or condition of which is involved in the case, or useful to enable the jury to understand the testimony, as of a place where a crime has been committed.
  • noun Specifically, inspection of a dead body; an autopsy.
  • noun The footing of a beast.
  • noun In Anglo-Saxon law, the office of a sheriff in seeing all the frank-pledges of a hundred, and that all youths above fourteen belonged to some tithing: a function of the court-leet.
  • noun Synonyms 4 and View, Prospect, Scene, Landscape. View is the most general of these words; prospect most suggests the idea that the beholder is at a place somewhat elevated, so as to be able to see far; scene most suggests the idea of resemblance to a picture; landscape most suggests the idea of diversity in unity.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To see; to behold; especially, to look at with attention, or for the purpose of examining; to examine with the eye; to inspect; to explore.
  • transitive verb To survey or examine mentally; to consider.
  • noun The act of seeing or beholding; sight; look; survey; examination by the eye; inspection.
  • noun Mental survey; intellectual perception or examination.
  • noun Power of seeing, either physically or mentally; reach or range of sight; extent of prospect.
  • noun That which is seen or beheld; sight presented to the natural or intellectual eye; scene; prospect.
  • noun The pictorial representation of a scene; a sketch, either drawn or painted.
  • noun Mode of looking at anything; manner of apprehension; conception; opinion; judgment.
  • noun That which is looked towards, or kept in sight, as object, aim, intention, purpose, design.
  • noun obsolete Appearance; show; aspect.
  • noun See under Field.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English vewe, from Anglo-Norman, from feminine past participle of veoir, to see, from Latin vidēre; see weid- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman vewe, from Old French veue (French: vue), feminine past participle of veoir ("to see") (French: voir).

Examples

  • Much depends on the point of view from which a man writes; and I can only say that, if the distinguished Major-general is right, _from a purely British point of view_, in depreciating the island and its resources, he thereby furnishes a _very strong argument why Great

    Newfoundland and the Jingoes An Appeal to England's Honor

  • For _distant_ views there is in nature scarcely any stereoscopic effect; and in a photographic stereoscopic view the effect produced is not really a representation to the eye of the _view itself_, but of _a model of such view_; and the apparent size of the model will vary with the angle of incidence of the two pictures, being _smaller_ and _nearer_ as the angle increases.

    Notes and Queries, Number 188, June 4, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • To view all photos in this entry please choose ¨view all photos¨ above or click on any photo to move to the album.

    TravelPod.com Recent Updates

  • This is important - coz in MAX 9 - hairs wont render with any render type (region, box, blowup, view etc.), other that #view.

    News

  • The term view can, according to context, refer to the consciousness of the viewer, or to the act of viewing, or to the object that is being viewed.

    Becoming Enlightened

  • The term view can, according to context, refer to the consciousness of the viewer, or to the act of viewing, or to the object that is being viewed.

    Becoming Enlightened

  • Cardinal Ratzinger: Today what people have in view is eliminating suffering from the world.

    Pope Benedict XVI

  • Cardinal Ratzinger: Today what people have in view is eliminating suffering from the world.

    Liturgy

  • I come from a very conservative town where nobody who disagrees with the main view is allowed to voice an opinion without being demonized, shouted out or ignored.

    I want you to stop stalking "overweight" women. - Feministing

  • Much of Richard Dawkins work breaks down religious belief one stage at a time so that his view from a scientific point of view is irrefutable.

    TIFF Review: Religulous | /Film

Comments

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  • VIEW - contraction: (verb) and pronoun.

    Usage: "I ain't never seed New York City... view?"

    April 8, 2008