Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A card game in which each player contributes stakes to a pool.
  • noun A toilet.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A dialectal (Scotch) form of love.
  • noun A game of cards.
  • noun The deposit, generally of three chips, which the players make in the pool in the game of loo.
  • Same as halloo.
  • To beat in the game of loo, as a player that has declared.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To beat in the game of loo by winning every trick.
  • noun An old game played with five, or three, cards dealt to each player from a full pack. When five cards are used the highest card is the knave of clubs or (if so agreed upon) the knave of trumps; -- formerly called lanterloo.
  • noun A modification of the game of “all fours” in which the players replenish their hands after each round by drawing each a card from the pack.
  • noun a round table adapted for a circle of persons playing loo.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun colloquial, Australia, New Zealand, UK A toilet.
  • noun A hot, dusty wind in Bihar and the Punjab.
  • noun A card game
  • verb transitive To beat in the game of loo by winning every trick.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a toilet in Britain

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Short for obsolete lanterloo, from French lanturlu, a meaningless refrain, loo.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Origin unknown.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Unknown; possible origins include:

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Hindi, from Sanskrit  (ulkā).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Chinese

Examples

Comments

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  • I just a read a story in the paper the other day saying this woman built a luxury loo in London exclusively for women. Just to get in you have to pay 5 pounds. Seems so ridiculous.

    January 14, 2007

  • Love the first WeirdNet definition. As if there is a single pissoir somewhere in Britian--Waterloo Station, probably--which has been affectionately dubbed "Loo."

    September 9, 2008

  • Newfoundland nickname for the Common Loon.

    January 12, 2009

  • it's also the british form of bathroom

    September 15, 2011

  • No, it's a British form of toilet.

    September 15, 2011

  • Like the first CD definition here. A Scot might say he's looking for loo, but don't believe him. He's just cottaging.

    September 15, 2011

  • Bilby, in my experience "loo" can refer to both the bathroom and the toilet. One can be on the loo or in the loo.

    September 15, 2011

  • My point is this. Let's say we have an arrangement where there is a water closet in one room and next to it a separate bathroom with tub and hand basin. If a person then says, "I'm going to the loo" (not in or on, as that would be giving it away), which room is your money fancying?

    September 16, 2011

  • It's odd that the tweets pull up 2 different Indonesian usages.

    “Makan tai aja loo~”

    @olinecrodd

    "You can just go eat shit."

    - loo is standing in for lu, which is borrowed from a Chinese dialect and is used in Jakarta slang to mean 'you'.

    “Jangan di tambah lagi la infusnyaa hari ini akuu uda di kasi pulang loo :((((”

    @aditarahmadani

    "(They) didn't put the drip in again today so I was allowed to return home."

    - loo appears to be a hip spelling of lho, which is a particle used simply for emphasis.

    September 16, 2011

  • My money is on the W.C.

    But equally, would one call a room with no toilet a "bathroom"? In your scenario, were "loo" to be replaced with "bathroom", I bet most people would still infer that the person was going to the room with the W.C. Ergo, "bathroom" is a synonym of "loo".

    The way the English language tiptoes around this subject is pretty pathetic. We require a polite, specific word for the thing itself (crapper or bog, perhaps) and also for the room (dunny, shithouse?) - words which aren't euphemisms. I'm fed up with restrooms and lavatories and washrooms and privies.

    September 16, 2011