Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An examination of records or financial accounts to check their accuracy.
  • noun An adjustment or correction of accounts.
  • noun An examined and verified account.
  • noun A thorough examination or evaluation.
  • intransitive verb To examine, verify, or correct the financial accounts of.
  • intransitive verb To attend (a course) without requesting or receiving academic credit.
  • intransitive verb To examine or evaluate (something) thoroughly.
  • intransitive verb To conduct an audit.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To make audit of; examine and verify by reference to vouchers, as an account or accounts: as, to audit the accounts of a treasurer.
  • To examine into the correctness of an account; act as an auditor.
  • noun Audience; hearing.
  • noun Official examination and verification of accounts or claims; an examination into accounts or dealings with money or property; especially, an examination of accounts by proper officers, or persons appointed for that purpose, who compare the charges with the vouchers, examine witnesses, and state the result.
  • noun Hence A calling to account; an examination into one's actions.
  • noun An account or a statement of account; a balance-sheet.
  • noun A periodical auditing or settlement of accounts; hence, receipts; revenues.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To settle or adjust an account.
  • noun obsolete An audience; a hearing.
  • noun An examination in general; a judicial examination.
  • noun The result of such an examination, or an account as adjusted by auditors; final account.
  • noun obsolete A general receptacle or receiver.
  • noun a kind of ale, brewed at the English universities, orig. for the day of audit.
  • noun an appendage to a cathedral, for the transaction of its business.
  • transitive verb To examine and adjust, as an account or accounts.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An examination in general.
  • noun A judicial examination.
  • noun An independent review and examination of records and activities to assess the adequacy of system controls, to ensure compliance with established policies and operational procedures, and to recommend necessary changes in controls, policies, or procedures
  • noun Scientology Spiritual counseling, which forms the core of Dianetics.
  • verb To conduct an independent review and examination of system records and activities in order to test the adequacy and effectiveness of data security and data integrity procedures, to ensure compliance with established policy and operational procedures, and to recommend any necessary changes
  • verb To attend an academic class on a not-for-academic-credit basis.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb attend academic courses without getting credit
  • noun an inspection of the accounting procedures and records by a trained accountant or CPA
  • verb examine carefully for accuracy with the intent of verification
  • noun a methodical examination or review of a condition or situation

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English (influenced by auditor, auditor), from Latin audītus, a hearing, from past participle of audīre, to hear; see au- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin audītus, from audiō ("I hear").

Examples

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Governing Class: The governor is wondering where all the visitors are, and New York City's comptroller tries to make the word audit something to get excited about.

    NYT > Home Page

  • The original ARSC simply didn't want us to confuse the term audit risk with review risk.

    AccountingWEB.com

  • Most of the audit is as expected and I ceased long ago getting ticked off about it; but the new focus on use tax – ie, not just did you collect and pay sales tax on your retail sales but did you pay proper sales tax on every purchase, is really annoying.

    Coyote Blog » Blog Archive » Hostage Crisis

  • This audit is the fourth completed so far by the watchdog in recent months, but the first that looked at how banks said they used their bailout dollars.

    Financial Dispatch: Bailout cop says govt. set ‘unrealistic expectations’

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