Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Something that is intended; an aim or purpose. synonym: intention.
  • noun Law The state of mind necessary for an act to constitute a crime.
  • adjective Firmly fixed; concentrated.
  • adjective Having the attention applied; engrossed.
  • adjective Having the mind and will focused on a specific purpose.
  • idiom (for/to) In every practical sense; practically.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To accuse; charge.
  • Firmly or steadfastly fixed or directed (upon something); fixed with strained or earnest attention: as, an intent look or gaze; his thoughts are intent upon his duty.
  • Having the mind bent or earnestly fixed upon something; sedulously engaged or settled: usually with on or upon: as, a person intent upon business or pleasure.
  • Earnestly attentive; strongly devoted: with to.
  • noun That which is intended; purpose; aim; design; intention; meaning.
  • noun In law: Personal intention; the state of mind in respect of intelligent volition; the voluntary purposing of an act: often distinguishable from the motive which led to the formation of the intent. See criminal intent, below.
  • noun The tendency imputable by law to an act; the constructive purpose of an action, for which the doer may be responsible, although the actual intent was not wrongful: as when a conveyance is said to be intended to defraud creditors, because, although it may have been without actual dishonest intention, it necessarily has that tendency.
  • noun Notion; idea; thought; opinion.
  • noun Attention; heed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of turning the mind toward an object; hence, a design; a purpose; intention; meaning; drift; aim.
  • noun in all applications or senses; practically; really; virtually; in essence; essentially.
  • adjective Closely directed; strictly attentive; bent; -- said of the mind, thoughts, etc..
  • adjective Having the mind closely directed to or bent on an object; sedulous; eager in pursuit of an object; -- formerly with to, but now with on.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The purpose of something that is intended.
  • noun law The state of someone’s mind at the time of committing an offence.
  • adjective Firmly fixed or concentrated on something.
  • adjective Engrossed.
  • adjective Unwavering from a course of action.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the intended meaning of a communication
  • noun an anticipated outcome that is intended or that guides your planned actions
  • adjective giving or marked by complete attention to

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English entent, from Old French, from Medieval Latin intentus, from Latin, an extending, from intentus, attentive to, strained, from past participle of intendere, to direct attention; see intend.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Existing since Middle English, from Old French entent or entente, ultimately from Latin intendere.

Examples

  • He saw a lean boy who seemed more mature than eight years old, his expression intent and serious.

    Shadow Princess

  • She was focused solely on Robert, her expression intent as she hung on his every word.

    Much Ado About Marriage

  • She was focused solely on Robert, her expression intent as she hung on his every word.

    Much Ado About Marriage

  • He saw a lean boy who seemed more mature than eight years old, his expression intent and serious.

    Shadow Princess

  • He saw a lean boy who seemed more mature than eight years old, his expression intent and serious.

    Shadow Princess

  • She was focused solely on Robert, her expression intent as she hung on his every word.

    Much Ado About Marriage

  • Lucien gripped her arms, his expression intent as he ordered, “Stay here.”

    Naughty or Nice

  • Lucien gripped her arms, his expression intent as he ordered, “Stay here.”

    Naughty or Nice

  • Lucien gripped her arms, his expression intent as he ordered, “Stay here.”

    Naughty or Nice

  • Now he takes a more subtle approach in his wording, but I think the intent is there.

    Democrats accuse GOP of inciting mobs

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