Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act or process of rising or going upward.
  • noun An advancement, especially in social status.
  • noun An upward slope or incline.
  • noun A going back in time or upward in genealogical succession.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of rising or ascending; upward movement: as, the ascent of vapors, or of a balloon.
  • noun Hence A rising from a lower to a higher state, degree, or grade; advancement.
  • noun The act of climbing or traveling up; the act of advancing from a lower to a higher position; a going up, as up a mountain, river, stairway, etc.
  • noun An eminence; a hill or high place.
  • noun The way by which one ascends; the means of ascending; acclivity; upward slope.
  • noun The angle made by an ascending line or surface with the horizontal line or plane: as, the road has an ascent of five degrees.
  • noun A proceeding upward or backward in time or in logical order of succession.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • The act of rising; motion upward; rise; a mounting upward
  • The way or means by which one ascends.
  • An eminence, hill, or high place.
  • The degree of elevation of an object, or the angle it makes with a horizontal line; inclination; rising grade.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of ascending. A motion upwards.
  • noun The way or means by which one ascends.
  • noun An eminence, hill, or high place.
  • noun The degree of elevation of an object, or the angle it makes with a horizontal line; inclination; rising grade.
  • noun typography The ascender height in a typeface.
  • noun An increase, for example in popularity or hierarchy

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a movement upward
  • noun an upward slope or grade (as in a road)
  • noun the act of changing location in an upward direction

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From ascend, on the model of descent.]

Examples

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