Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The attainment of a dignity or rank: the queen's accession to the throne.
  • n. Something that has been acquired or added; an acquisition.
  • n. An increase by means of something added.
  • n. Law The addition to or increase in value of property by means of improvements or natural growth.
  • n. Law The right of a proprietor to ownership of such addition or increase.
  • n. Agreement or assent.
  • n. Access; admittance.
  • n. A sudden outburst.
  • transitive v. To record in the order of acquisition: a curator accessioning newly acquired paintings.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A coming to; the act of acceding and becoming joined; as, a king's accession to a confederacy.
  • n. Increase by something added; that which is added; augmentation from without.
  • n. A mode of acquiring property, by which the owner of a corporeal substance which receives an addition by growth, or by labor, has a right to the part or thing added, or the improvement (provided the thing is not changed into a different species).
  • n. The act by which one power becomes party to engagements already in force between other powers.
  • n. The act of coming to or reaching a throne, an office, or dignity.
  • n. The invasion, approach, or commencement of a disease; a fit or paroxysm.
  • n. Agreement.
  • n. Access; admittance.
  • v. To make a record of (additions to a collection).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A coming to; the act of acceding and becoming joined.
  • n. Increase by something added; that which is added; augmentation from without.
  • n.
  • n. A mode of acquiring property, by which the owner of a corporeal substance which receives an addition by growth, or by labor, has a right to the part or thing added, or the improvement (provided the thing is not changed into a different species). Thus, the owner of a cow becomes the owner of her calf.
  • n. The act by which one power becomes party to engagements already in force between other powers.
  • n. The act of coming to or reaching a throne, an office, or dignity; ; -- applied especially to the epoch of a new dynasty.
  • n. The invasion, approach, or commencement of a disease; a fit or paroxysm.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A coming, as into the possession of a right or station; attainment; entrance; induction: as, the accession of the people to political power, or to the ballot; accession to an estate, or to the throne.
  • n. The act of acceding, as by assent or agreement; consent; junction; adhesion: as, accession to a demand or proposal; their accession to the party or confederacy was a great gain.
  • n. Increase by something added; that which is added; augmentation; addition: as, an accession of wealth, territory, or numbers.
  • n. In law, a mode of acquiring property, by which the owner of a corporeal substance which receives an addition by growth or by the application of labor has a right to the thing added or to the improvement, as an addition to a house made by a tenant under an ordinary lease.
  • n. In medicine, the attack, approach, or commencement of a disease; access.
  • n. In the election of a pope, the transference of votes from one candidate to another, when the scrutiny has not resulted in a choice. The opportunity of doing this is called an accessit (which see).
  • n. Increase, addition, increment, extension, augmentation.
  • To enter in the accession-book of a library. See accession-book.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. something added to what you already have
  • n. the act of attaining or gaining access to a new office or right or position (especially the throne)
  • n. agreeing with or consenting to (often unwillingly)
  • n. the right to enter
  • n. a process of increasing by addition (as to a collection or group)
  • v. make a record of additions to a collection, such as a library
  • n. (civil law) the right to all of that which your property produces whether by growth or improvement

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The prospect of Jang's accession is a less than comforting thought.

    The Son Has Yet to Rise in North Korea

  • Brussels needs to accept that EU accession is no longer the galvanizing reform force in Ukraine.

    Ukraine's Economic Revolution

  • To the Gentiles, some of all nations, that should be converted to Christ, and so added to his church, which, though a spiritual accession, is often in prophecy represented by a local motion.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume IV (Isaiah to Malachi)

  • They derived some accession from a body of two thousand strangers, under the command of John Justiniani, a noble Genoese; a liberal donative was advanced to these auxiliaries; and a princely recompense, the Isle of Lemnos, was promised to the valor and victory of their chief.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • “Well, but, Mrs. Baliol, suppose we settle our era: you do not call the accession of James the Sixth to the kingdom of Britain very ancient?”

    Chronicles of the Canongate

  • Her accession was a gaudy affair, and well attended, though it might seem strange from our end of time that people would turn out peaceably to see the murderess of S'task take up the spear of royalty.

    The Romulan Way

  • Accepting this as a true account of an eternal, a perdurable Existent — one which never turns to any Kind outside itself, that possesses life complete once for all, that has never received any accession, that is now receiving none and will never receive any — we have, with the statement of a perduring

    The Six Enneads.

  • The particular question concerning France that was agitating Germany at the time of the accession was the state of affairs in

    William of Germany

  • Although his accession was the occasion of friendly letters between himself and the Government of Madras, the Nawab's rejection of the Governor's suggestion that the financial arrangements between himself and the Company should be made more favourable to the

    The Story of Madras

  • The particular question concerning France that was agitating Germany at the time of the accession was the state of affairs in Alsace-Lorraine, and particularly Bismarck's measure requiring French citizens entering the provinces to provide themselves with a pass from the German Ambassador in Paris.

    William of Germany

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