Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A proposition that follows with little or no proof required from one already proven.
  • noun A deduction or an inference.
  • noun A natural consequence or effect; a result.
  • adjective Consequent; resultant.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Same as corollar and corollate.
  • noun In mathematics, a proposition incidentally proved in proving another; an immediate or easily drawn consequence; hence, any inference similarly drawn.
  • noun A surplus; something in excess.
  • noun Synonyms Conclusion, etc. See inference.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete That which is given beyond what is actually due, as a garland of flowers in addition to wages; surplus; something added or superfluous.
  • noun Something which follows from the demonstration of a proposition; an additional inference or deduction from a demonstrated proposition; a consequence.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Something given beyond what is actually due; something added or superfluous.
  • noun Something which occurs a fortiori, as a result of another effort without significant additional effort.
  • noun mathematics, logic A proposition which follows easily from the proof of another proposition.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a practical consequence that follows naturally
  • noun (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English corolarie, from Latin corōllārium, money paid for a garland, gratuity, from corōlla, small garland; see corolla.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Late Latin corōllārium ("deduction, consequence, originally money paid for a garland, hence gift, gratuity, something extra"), from corōlla ("small garland"), diminutive of corōna ("crown").

Examples

Comments

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  • "A corollary to this, is that by teaching something to someone, you actually end up understanding it better, because it forces you to refine your thinking."

    Source: 8 Ways To Help You Learn Everything Faster

    January 22, 2018

  • a corollary is that you must work hard in order to repay your piling debts.

    March 9, 2018