Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Firmly in position; stationary.
  • adj. Determined; established; set: at a fixed time; a fixed price.
  • adj. Not subject to change or variation; constant: pensioners on a fixed income.
  • adj. Chemistry Not readily evaporating; nonvolatile.
  • adj. Chemistry Being in a stable, combined form: fixed nitrogen.
  • adj. Firmly, often dogmatically held: fixed beliefs.
  • adj. Persistently occurring in the mind; obsessive: a fixed, delusive notion.
  • adj. Supplied, especially with funds or needs. Often used in combination: a well-fixed bachelor.
  • adj. Illegally prearranged as to outcome: a fixed election.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of fix.
  • adj. Not changing, not able to be changed, staying the same.
  • adj. Stationary.
  • adj. Attached; affixed
  • adj. Chemically stable.
  • adj. Supplied with what one needs.
  • adj. To record a sound on a permanent medium

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Securely placed or fastened; settled; established; firm; imovable; unalterable.
  • adj. Stable; non-volatile.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Firm; fast; stable; permanent; of a determinate or unfluctuating character; hence, appointed; settled; established: as, fixed laws; a fixed sum; fixed prices; a fixed time; fixed habits or opinions.
  • Permanently placed or situated; established as to position or relation: as, the planets have fixed orbits; the fixed stars (so called from their always appearing to occupy the same place).
  • In heraldry, same as firme.
  • In zoology, not free or locomotory; rooted or otherwise attached to some object.
  • In com., without grace or days of grace: said of drafts and other commercial papers payable on a specified date without grace.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. incapable of being changed or moved or undone; e.g.
  • adj. fixed and unmoving
  • adj. (of a number) having a fixed and unchanging value
  • adj. securely placed or fastened or set

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We find it fixed in these stones, for which reason Dr. Black called it “fixed air”—finding it in these fixed things like marble and chalk—he called it fixed air because it lost its quality of air, and assumed the condition of a solid body.

    The Chemical History of a Candle

  • Fortune, -- "Volve sua spera, e beata si gode:" the motive power of this wheel distinguishing its goddess from the fixed majesty of Necessitas with her iron nails; or [Greek: anankê], with her pillar of fire and iridescent orbits, _fixed_ at the centre.

    The Crown of Wild Olive also Munera Pulveris; Pre-Raphaelitism; Aratra Pentelici; The Ethics of the Dust; Fiction, Fair and Foul; The Elements of Drawing

  • Jules was on his back, his expression fixed in a blank stare.

    hush, hush

  • The term fixed by Madame Desvarennes with the Prince had expired that morning.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

  • Finally the term fixed for carrying out certain obligations of the contract expired without their fulfillment by the company, and the concession was forfeited.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 344, August 5, 1882

  • President Hutchins desired to resign the Presidency in 1914, at the end of the term fixed by him in his letter of acceptance, but the Regents were unanimous in their desire to have him remain in office.

    The University of Michigan

  • Egyptian finance, as he feared panic towards the end of the term fixed; but the Ambassador said that the Chancellor attached no importance to any form of control.

    The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke, Volume 1

  • A new winter campaign was almost a certainty, and yet the Germans insisted that though mistakes occurred in the term fixed, this was not so respecting the ultimate effect of the U-boats and that England would collapse.

    Im Weltkriege. English

  • The register books of the parish show admirable specimens of his wonderful writing, and I have in my possession a tracing made by Mr. Wise, of Weekley, from the label fixed inside the cover of one of the large folio Prayer Books which used to be in the Duke of Buccleuch's pew before the church was restored, and were then removed to Boughton

    The Parish Clerk

  • On both hands we find the term fixed according to the day of the month, the strictly prescribed joint burnt-offering and sin-offering, the absence of relation first-fruits and agriculture, the obliteration of natural distinctions so as to make one general churchly festival.

    Prolegomena

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