Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Precisely limited or defined; definite.
  • adjective Conclusively settled; final.
  • adjective Firm in purpose; resolute.
  • adjective Terminating in a flower and blooming in a sequence beginning with the uppermost or central flower.
  • adjective Not continuing indefinitely at the tip of an axis.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To bring to an end; terminate.
  • noun In Weismann's doctrine of determinants, any cell which has distinctive hereditary qualities.
  • Having defined limits; fixed; definite; clearly defined or definable; particular: as, a determinate quantity of matter.
  • Predetermined; settled; positive: as, a determinate rule or order.
  • Decisive; conclusive.
  • Determined upon; intended.
  • Fixed in purpose; resolute; determined.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb obsolete To bring to an end; to determine. See determine.
  • adjective Having defined limits; not uncertain or arbitrary; fixed; established; definite.
  • adjective Conclusive; decisive; positive.
  • adjective obsolete Determined or resolved upon.
  • adjective obsolete Of determined purpose; resolute.
  • adjective (Bot.) that in which the flowering commences with the terminal bud of a stem, which puts a limit to its growth; -- also called centrifugal inflorescence.
  • adjective (Math.) a problem which admits of a limited number of solutions.
  • adjective (Math.) those that are finite in the number of values or solutions, that is, in which the conditions of the problem or equation determine the number.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective biology Of growth: ending once a genetically predetermined structure has formed.
  • noun philosophy A single state of a particular determinable attribute.
  • verb obsolete To bring to an end; to determine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective not continuing to grow indefinitely at the apex
  • adjective precisely determined or limited or defined; especially fixed by rule or by a specific and constant cause
  • adjective supplying or being a final or conclusive settlement

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Latin dēterminātus, past participle of dētermināre, to determine; see determine.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin dēterminātus, perfect passive participle of dēterminō ("limit, set bounds").

Examples

  • The Cambridge logician W.E. Johnson introduced the terms determinate and determinable to apply to examples such as red and colored.

    Determinates vs. Determinables

  • The sovereign he defined as a determinate human superior who receives habitual obedience from the bulk of a given society and is not himself in the habit of obedience to any superior.

    CONCEPT OF LAW

  • The sovereign he defined as a determinate human superior who receives habitual obedience from the bulk of a given society and is not himself in the habit of obedience to any superior.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Between the child and the living creatures which he cultivates there is born a mysterious correspondence which induces the child to fulfil certain determinate acts without the intervention of the teacher, that is, leads him to an auto-education.

    The Montessori Method

  • This, I think, may fitly be called a determinate or determined idea, when such as it is at any time objectively in the mind, and so determined there, it is annexed, and without variation determined, to a name or articulate sound, which is to be steadily the sign of that very same object of the mind, or determinate idea.

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • If the microstructure of the world is absolutely determinate, that is absolute determinacy enough.

    Determinates vs. Determinables

  • His terms determinate, determinable, occurrent, continuant and ostensive definition have entered the philosophical lexicon.

    Determinates vs. Determinables

  • But, as in the case of universal validity, the necessity is not based on concepts or rules (at least, not concepts or rules that are determinate, that is, of a kind which figure in cognition; as noted earlier in this section, Kant describes it, in the Antinomy of Taste, as resting on an indeterminate concept).

    Kant's Aesthetics and Teleology

  • It really varies from executive order to executive order, to regulation to regulation, and the determinate will be the substance of each regulation or executive order.

    CNN Transcript - Special Event: Bush Spokesman Ari Fleischer Holds Transition Team News Briefing - January 3, 2001

  • Clodfelter presented the case to a McLennan County grand jury, which approved her request to proceed with the case through what is known as determinate sentencing.

    wacotrib - Latest News Headlines

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