Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Relating to or resembling a cyme; determinate.
  • adj. Bearing a cyme or cymes.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. having a usually flat-topped flower cluster in which the main and branch stems each end in a flower that opens before those below it or to its side.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having the nature of a cyme, or derived from a cyme; bearing, or pertaining to, a cyme or cymes.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Bearing a cyme; composed of cymes; pertaining to or resembling a cyme.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having a usually flat-topped flower cluster in which the main and branch stems each end in a flower that opens before those below it or to its side

Etymologies

cym(e) + -ose1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the Latin cȳmōsus, from cȳma, whence the English cyma. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The flowers are solitary or cymose and vary in colour from white to purple.

    Chapter 30

  • The instances just cited all occur in plants having an indefinite form of inflorescence; but the production of a tuft of leaves or of a leafy shoot above or beyond the inflorescence is not confined to plants with this habit of growth, for Jacquin figures and describes an instance of this nature in the cymose flower-stems of a

    Vegetable Teratology An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants

  • Instances of adhesion between different organs is seen under ordinary circumstances in the bract of the Lime tree, which adheres to the peduncle, also in _Neuropeltis_, while in _Erythrochiton hypophyllanthus_ the cymose peduncles are adherent to the under surface of the leaf.

    Vegetable Teratology An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants

  • Zoosporangia formed from their tips, generally cylindrical or slightly clavate, rarely short and in series; the later ones arising within the empty membranes of preceding ones by upward growth of their basal walls, or rarely beside them by cymose branching.

    Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

  • Prolification in both varieties is also more frequently met with in branched inflorescences than in those in which the flowers are sessile; but the degree of branching seems less material, inasmuch as this malformation is more commonly recorded as occurring in racemes than in the more branched panicles, &c. From the similar arrest of growth in length, in the case of the flower, to that which occurs in the stem in the case of definite inflorescence, it might have been expected that axillary prolification would be more frequent in plants having a cymose arrangement of their flowers than in those whose inflorescence is indefinite; such, however, is not the case.

    Vegetable Teratology An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants

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